10 Best Graphic Cards for Ethereum (ETH) Mining (2020)

Mining profitability gaining momentum

Mining profitability gaining momentum
We are back!
For the last 2 years there was not much to shill in mining mining was on the life support. And the profits constantly got decreasing. Start of 2020 Bitcoin and Altcoins are showing great performance in price action. This price action has also increased mining profits in some coins for more then 100% since december 2019. It might be to early to say that “we are back” , as crypto can be so unpredictable. But there is a lot of signs that we have now oversold a lot and value of crypto market is increasing steadily. We might see this pattern continue for good bit of times as BTC halving is coming up in 3 month. Let’s get in straight in. I will choose 3 hardware devices which in my opinion would be the best choice and we will see how profitable they are.
If you are new to mining and you want to know which devices to choose, choose from top market cap coins latest equipment. This will be your safest bet, as the mining profits are much more stable on bigger cap coins then on smaller cap coins. If you are small miner and don’t have large electric bills, you can choose smaller cap coins. They might go up in price lot faster then bigger cap coins in bull market, but be aware they they might dump lot faster. It is high risk high reward type of mining.
If you are really serious about mining, you need to look at cheapest power source possible which would be in 0.05c a kw/h range. It is not 2017 and mining from home wont be profitable at 0.30c a kw/h. Industrial power is possible to achieve 0.05 in many places in the world. If it is not possible in your country , look for the country where it is possible. So all profit calculations done for 0.05c a kw/h
Top mining profitability websites :
  • https://www.asicminervalue.com/ It is great website to see newest ASIC miners and their profitability. Usually the new upcoming mining machines gets listed here. So come and checkout this page every few days/weeks this page if you are serious about mining.

https://preview.redd.it/aut9qgz76df41.png?width=1206&format=png&auto=webp&s=b85486b8b0171c91301c6fa9827bc3795a4ea2b7
  • https://whattomine.com/ Is the best known for GPU/CPU mining profitability. You can choose what ever hardware to use and it will give you the best and most profitable coins to mine. It is very simple to use it. It does have Also asic miner profitability check, but for asics i do prefer asicminervalue,com

https://preview.redd.it/y0xr3dr86df41.png?width=1182&format=png&auto=webp&s=439e7cb67f8becc86f4d97c128504636922939e9
The top and 3 most profitable Crypto currencies to mine in February 2020 , for some people miner pick could be different. The prices changes if you are buying new/used , depending in which part of the world are you. This is my recommended , brand new purchase in Europe.
  • Bitcoin – Most suitable Antminer S17+ . It is one of the efficient Bitcoin miner currently publicly available, alternatives would be M20s miner and Avalon miner 1166. Antminer S17 efficiency is 73TH/s @ 3000watts . Current profitability after you have paid your electric bill is 7.82 usd in 24hours , with ROI achievable in 6-7month. It does seems great, but crypto doesn’t stand still. And has plenty of risks.

https://preview.redd.it/msokirj96df41.png?width=891&format=png&auto=webp&s=7552b4aff2c0df4c25d9a72ecc25dfb4c2510f43
  • Ethereum – Best miner to use is RX5700 graphic cards mining rig. I know there is an ASIC miner available A10, but most of you who are in mining will agree with me, that it is complete junk. It is only slightly more efficient then RX5700 gpu rig in terms of price per hash and watt per hash . But it is 10x more riskier investment in mining rig then buying GPU mining rig. So the efficiency of 12xgpu RX5700 mining rig is 640 mh/s @ 1700watts. Current profitability after you have paid your electric bill is 7.62 usd in 24hours , with ROI achievable in about 20-22 month. Ethereum is one of the underdogs which could perform quite well in 2020 and might reduce your ROI much more faster.

https://preview.redd.it/ajx9eyfc6df41.png?width=894&format=png&auto=webp&s=30442d846a9d70ea3eaac6eaf7c2bdbe476384e4
  • DASH – Lately has been released most efficient DASH miner STU-U6. Asic miners are very risky investment, but sometimes they might be very profitable. The beauty of this miner is that it is quite new model and it is mining profitably DASH , even that DASH is still over 90%down from its all time highs. This miner performance is 420GH/s u/2100 watts. Current profitability after you have paid your electric bill is 8.11 usd in 24hours , with ROI achievable in about 5-6 month.

https://preview.redd.it/l80xnwbd6df41.png?width=902&format=png&auto=webp&s=5620ecf7af742cdcae0ae7010cf910d9131ae801
These would be my to pick miners for start of 2020. There is big risks in any on these miners as no high reward investment is guaranteed anywhere. I’ll have more detailed explanation of the risks of each of these miners in my next post.
Any miner suggestion, what would be your best choice and why?

Video here - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QvVYQFJEmnQ&t
submitted by mineshop to gpumining [link] [comments]

With all this fork drama and FUD happening, Vertcoin is the safe heaven with great potential to become the next major cryptocurrency

Before anyone starts pointing out that this is another "dumb shilling post", hear me out.
I strongly believe that Vertcoin could become the next top 10 major cryptocurrency.
2017 was and STILL IS a bloodbath in cryptoworld. All the Bitcoin forks, FUD, and heavy manipulation discouraged many crypto investors to dive in further. Suppressing our community as a whole to progress through this brave new world. Some of you may have FOMO'd (fear of missing out) or fell into the hands of deceptions like Bitconnect and lost quite a bit of your hard-earned money. Let the emotions aside, Vertcoin will and IS going to be the next major player in the crypto market. Here are some basic reasons why Vertcoin will reach that level.
  1. VTC is the ASIC-resistant coin and more people will care. Why? Let me explain ASIC mining has been concentrated into relatively centralized data centers operated by professionals which makes it less decentralized consensus. Instead of any random person, using a relatively powerful computer, you are dependent upon only people who are advanced enough to operate specialized ASIC hardware and who buy it from handful of companies that can distribute the hardware however they please and to some extent for whatever price they please because the demand is high. Hence, we need those coins whose algorithm shows “resistance” to ASIC hardware and the only coin who is extremely committed to remain ASIC resistance is Vertcoin. The reason is that it has not only memory intensive algorithm (Lyra2Rev2) which makes it particularly difficult to develop an ASIC in the future but it has proved in the past (by hard forking) that if someone tried to make ASICs for vertcoin; it will hard fork to remain ASIC resistant and hence “the people’s coin. https://coinpupil.com/2017/10/17/introduction-vertcoin-asic-resistant-cryptocurrency/.
  2. VTC is the cheapest of the BTC/LTC/VTC trio and yet has a comparable social following to LTC. (In the future, sooner or later, atomic swaps between BTC/LTC/VTC will be available, allowing the three coins to exchange for each other immediately for free without needing a medium, ex. 3rd party exchanges like Bittrex)
  3. If trading volume is a strong indicator of value, and I believe it is, VTC is crazy undervalued
  4. VTC is an old coin (Jan 2014) with a large base of people who know it by name. Hence, it's foundation is solid.
  5. Thank's to it's strong and genuine community, Vertcoin's reputation is highly regarded. To the point that even many Pump and Dump groups see this coin as a legit, solid crypto that has a strong potential.
  6. Transaction speed is nearly instant as well as the fee is very cheap (0.02VTC).
  7. Extremely active developers. But what's important is that they are genuine. You can chat with them and will reply to you in discord chat. They will let you know what is going on and what is going to happen without covering it up.
Pros aside, it is no doubt that Vertcoin is or at least used to be the target of manipulation. However, Vertcoin had survived all the heavy manipulations. In fact, it helped Vertcoin to build a stronger ground, higher lows and higher highs. At this point, Vertcoin is extremely difficult to be manipulated largely due to it's enormous increase in volume and well-liked community throughout the cryptoworld. Go ask anyone who knows about cryptos if Vertcoin is a solid coin. Yes, there are some minorities who will dislike Vertcoin. But overall, most people will say yes.
Here are the future updates on Vertcoin. 1. Atomic Swaps - exchange of one cryptocurrency to another cryptocurrency, without the need to trust a third-party. 2. Block halving (estimated to be around December 11-12th) - It cut's the block reward to the miners by half. A potential price catalyst. 3. Stealth Addresses - A traditional bank account is based on a private ledger in which the transaction history is only known to the account holder and the bank. In such a system the account holder can widely distribute his/her account number and receive any number of payments without exposing the account history to the payers or casual observers. This is essentially what is accomplished with stealth addresses, without sacrificing the decentralization of the currency. 4. AMD Miner - Currently, Vertcoin's one click miner (you can literally download the program, type in the address, and click! All those VTC's will flow into your wallet) doesn't do well with AMD graphic cards. Therefore, all the AMD miners are still left out. As soon as AMD Miner releases (by this year), it will greatly increase Vertcoin's hash power. Theoretically doubling the current hashpower instantly because there are only 2 consumer GPU markets, AMD and Nvidia. 5. Wallets - Yes Vertcoin does not support many wallets but it is in progress. iOS mobile wallet and as well as many more wallets will be supported very soon (upcoming patch I believe) 6. Ethereum switching from Proof of Work to Proof of Stake. Meaning that it will leave a lot of orphan ETH GPU miners coming to VTC. **All of this upcoming updates should be completed by end of this year.
Currently, cryptoworld is like the 1984's internet (netscape) era. Back then, there were lots of speculations and panic. In the next year or so, scam ICO's will be eliminated as well as many other shady coins like beeeconneecctt. Vertcoin and as well as some other solid coins will survive this bloodbath and become one of the top contenders in the crypto market.
Special thanks to @theBARBARIC and @Mo9731 for some details.
Thank You.
submitted by TDKOtherSide to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

With all this fork drama and FUD happening, Vertcoin is the safe heaven with great potential to become the next major cryptocurrency

Before anyone starts pointing out that this is another "dumb shilling post", hear me out.
I strongly believe that Vertcoin could become the next top 10 major cryptocurrency.
2017 was and STILL IS a bloodbath in cryptoworld. All the Bitcoin forks, FUD, and heavy manipulation discouraged many crypto investors to dive in further. Suppressing our community as a whole to progress through this brave new world. Some of you may have FOMO'd (fear of missing out) or fell into the hands of deceptions like Bitconnect and lost quite a bit of your hard-earned money. Let the emotions aside, Vertcoin will and IS going to be the next major player in the crypto market. Here are some basic reasons why Vertcoin will reach that level.
  1. VTC is the ASIC-resistant coin and more people will care. Why? Let me explain ASIC mining has been concentrated into relatively centralized data centers operated by professionals which makes it less decentralized consensus. Instead of any random person, using a relatively powerful computer, you are dependent upon only people who are advanced enough to operate specialized ASIC hardware and who buy it from handful of companies that can distribute the hardware however they please and to some extent for whatever price they please because the demand is high. Hence, we need those coins whose algorithm shows “resistance” to ASIC hardware and the only coin who is extremely committed to remain ASIC resistance is Vertcoin. The reason is that it has not only memory intensive algorithm (Lyra2Rev2) which makes it particularly difficult to develop an ASIC in the future but it has proved in the past (by hard forking) that if someone tried to make ASICs for vertcoin; it will hard fork to remain ASIC resistant and hence “the people’s coin. https://coinpupil.com/2017/10/17/introduction-vertcoin-asic-resistant-cryptocurrency/.
  2. VTC is the cheapest of the BTC/LTC/VTC trio and yet has a comparable social following to LTC. (In the future, sooner or later, atomic swaps between BTC/LTC/VTC will be available, allowing the three coins to exchange for each other immediately for free without needing a medium, ex. 3rd party exchanges like Bittrex)
  3. If trading volume is a strong indicator of value, and I believe it is, VTC is crazy undervalued
  4. VTC is an old coin (Jan 2014) with a large base of people who know it by name. Hence, it's foundation is solid.
  5. Thank's to it's strong and genuine community, Vertcoin's reputation is highly regarded. To the point that even many Pump and Dump groups see this coin as a legit, solid crypto that has a strong potential.
  6. Transaction speed is nearly instant as well as the fee is very cheap (0.02VTC).
  7. Extremely active developers. But what's important is that they are genuine. You can chat with them and will reply to you in discord chat. They will let you know what is going on and what is going to happen without covering it up.
Pros aside, it is no doubt that Vertcoin is or at least used to be the target of manipulation. However, Vertcoin had survived all the heavy manipulations. In fact, it helped Vertcoin to build a stronger ground, higher lows and higher highs. At this point, Vertcoin is extremely difficult to be manipulated largely due to it's enormous increase in volume and well-liked community throughout the cryptoworld. Go ask anyone who knows about cryptos if Vertcoin is a solid coin. Yes, there are some minorities who will dislike Vertcoin. But overall, most people will say yes.
Here are the future updates on Vertcoin. 1. Atomic Swaps - exchange of one cryptocurrency to another cryptocurrency, without the need to trust a third-party. 2. Block halving (estimated to be around December 11-12th) - It cut's the block reward to the miners by half. A potential price catalyst. 3. Stealth Addresses - A traditional bank account is based on a private ledger in which the transaction history is only known to the account holder and the bank. In such a system the account holder can widely distribute his/her account number and receive any number of payments without exposing the account history to the payers or casual observers. This is essentially what is accomplished with stealth addresses, without sacrificing the decentralization of the currency. 4. AMD Miner - Currently, Vertcoin's one click miner (you can literally download the program, type in the address, and click! All those VTC's will flow into your wallet) doesn't do well with AMD graphic cards. Therefore, all the AMD miners are still left out. As soon as AMD Miner releases (by this year), it will greatly increase Vertcoin's hash power. Theoretically doubling the current hashpower instantly because there are only 2 consumer GPU markets, AMD and Nvidia. 5. Wallets - Yes Vertcoin does not support many wallets but it is in progress. iOS mobile wallet and as well as many more wallets will be supported very soon (upcoming patch I believe) 6. Ethereum switching from Proof of Work to Proof of Stake. Meaning that it will leave a lot of orphan ETH GPU miners coming to VTC. **All of this upcoming updates should be completed by end of this year.
Currently, cryptoworld is like the 1984's internet (netscape) era. Back then, there were lots of speculations and panic. In the next year or so, scam ICO's will be eliminated as well as many other shady coins like beeeconneecctt. Vertcoin and as well as some other solid coins will survive this bloodbath and become one of the top contenders in the crypto market.
Special thanks to @theBARBARIC and @Mo9731 for some details.
Thank You.
submitted by TDKOtherSide to vertcoin [link] [comments]

I had like 3 friends ask me how to build a PC in the past week so I made this to help them.

(Reddit Edit: Help my improve the document with productive constructive comments on what I got wrong or messed up! Im only human lol
Also a lot of this is supposed to be kinda humorous. I didn't think I had to say that but, hey, its the internet.
I appreciate the positive and productive comments! )
Beginners basic guide to building your own PC as of early 2018
(EDIT: Sorry for being a MSI/Corsair Fanboy)
Heres a collection of thoughts to consider when building your own personal PC
As always Id personally use PCPartPicker.com to configure your parts and for further thoughts on compatibility.
First off building a computer is 100% based around what you plan to use the computer for.
Here are a few uses and generic ideas of what to go for. Audio Editing: Lots of small tasks that need to be completed quickly without lag. - Fast Processor( >4GHZ) - Fast RAM (MHZ) -At least 16 gigs! - Fast Storage, SSD manditorily - M.2 or PCI for best performance. - Shitty Graphics card, graphics card there only to keep the cpu from doing other tasks when working. - Can be a few generations or years old. - Many screens for lots of plug in windows to be open Video Editing: Lots of large to render and files to read. - Multi core processor the more the merrier - SSD for fast read/write of large video files. - Insane graphics card, AMD graphics cards are debatibly better but the nvidia Quadro series are specific for video rendering. Gaming: No more than 4 cores intense graphics card - 92% of games are not coded for more than 4 cores so why spend the extra money for it. - SSD for quick load screens - Nvidia cards, 10 series, the higher the number the better. Titan cards for MAXIMUM OVERDRIVE! Coding: quick processor for lots of small tasks. Ergonomic peripherials? - Dear god please dont use a mechanical keyboard so that your coworkers dont kill you. Home office: Everything can be a few gens behind so you can get the best power per dollar spent. - Sorry that Gateway doesnt exist anymore. I guess try Dell... 
Parts (Expensive Legos)
CPU (tells things to go places and outputs data) Basically three main routes to go for: Intel, AMD, or ASIC. Intel - Gaming, Data center, Hackintosh Pros: Cooler, Faster speed (GHZ), short small tasks faster Cons: $$$$, less cores AMD - Gaming, Personal Computing, Large task processing Pros: Lots of cores, better price per performance, faster processing of large tasks Cons: Hot chips, large chips?, compatibility issues with MacOS. ASIC - "Application-specific integrated circuit" Pros: Does the task that they are made to do insanely efficently, great for mining. Cons: Literally does nothing else. Holy hell these are expensive, very hot (fans will get loud) CPU Cooler (Im a big fan) Most come with an in box cooler that are ok but please buy aftermarket. In Box - the free shitty cooler that comes with the processor. Pros: Free. Cons: Ugly, makes chip run hot, hard to clean Air cooler - oldest type of cooler but new designs are highly efficent. Pros: Only cooler that has the possibility of being 100% quiet, most likely cheaper Cons: large, if cooler isnt large enough for the chips thermal output the fans will be loud. Liquid - Custom pipes are beautiful, AIO is easy to install and offers similare performance. Pros: Looks cool, great temperatures, "quiet" Cons: Water pump has possibility of being loud, possible spills Phase Change - uses the technology of refridgerators to cool the chip Pros: Can overclock until the chip breaks. (whats colder than cold? ICE COLD!) Cons: Loud (compressor noise), Large pipes, just why.... Motherboard (the convienacnce store of computer parts) Really just about what type of I/O you want. - MAKE SURE FORM FACTOR FITS YOUR CASE! (or vice versa) - Look for PCI lanes for expansion. - How many graphic cards do you have? - PCI based interfaces? - PCI SSD? - PCI DAC? - PCI WIFI? - USbs? Network? Audio? - How many lanes of RAM? - DOES IT FIT YOUR PROCESSOR!?! (really tho) - M.2? - How many sata interaces? Good Brands: MSI, ASUS, Gigabyte Bad Brands: AS(s)Rock, Dell Memory (Dory) - The more the merrier - No less than 8gb for a functional windows machine (16 gb to never have a problem) - Use all the lanes your computer has to offer! the more lanes to access the faster the data can travel! -Imagine drinking a milkshake. If the straw is wider you can drink more of the milkshake than a skinny straw. - Faster MHZ for faster data access but give minimal performance differances - Please get ram with heat spreadders unles youre building a server with high airflow. - Make sure the type (DDR3 or DDR4) of RAM matches what your processomotherboard call for. Good Brands: Corsair, G.Skill, Ballistix Storage (Grandpa that remembers everythign about how things used to be but takes forever to learn a new tasK) Speed or massive storage? slower is cheaper. Golden ratio of speed/storage/price is 250-500 gb SSD and a 1+ tb disk drive. *Max speeds listed are for a single drive not RAID* Hard Disk Drives (HDD) - Cheapest and slowest - read/write speeds of < 0.5gb/s - 7200+ RPM or GTFO - Higher Speed drives can access data faster. - Do not move while powered up. physical parts will break. - Larger Cahche = faster Read/Write Speeds Pros: Cheap, Holds massive amounts of data Cons: Slower than molasses in a frezer Reputible Brands: Seagate, WD Solid State Drives (SSD) - necessity for quick boots and fast load screens (can only be re-written to so many times) - SATA based (2.5 inch)- Read/Write speeds capped @ 6 gb/s Pros: Most economical, form factor fits with old computers, Cons: "Slow" compared to other ssd's (but stil 12 times faster than a HDD) - M.2 based - Read/Write speeds capped @ 10 gb/s Pros: Size of a sick of gum! High End but not too expensive to be out of reach. Cons: Expensive for any size over 500 gb - PCI based - Read/Write speeds capped @ 20 gb/s for PCI3, x4 Pros: HOLY BANDWIDTH BATMAN! Faster than that little creepy ghost thats always in the corner of you eye Cons: You might have to take out a loan to buy one. *takes up a x4 PCI Lane* Reputible Brands: Samsung! Corsair, Plextor, Intel, Kingston, Crucial Video Card (that one kid that has thick glasses and is really good at math) - A regular old PCI card that handles all of the video rendering and output for your computer. - ASIC PCI cards. - The PCBs and chips are patented by two main companies but the differances come from line up and varying manufacturer cooling devices. - The more memory the better -NVIDIA (Team Green) Great for gaming, has specific card series for intensive rendering. Lazy driver updates. - Gaming - 900 series - Cheap - Low performance - Can play any video game made befrore 2010 on max settings - 1000 (ten) series - Expensive (thanks bitcoin miners...) - Great for VR! - Video Rendering -Quadro Series - Gaming and Rendering - Titan X - Maxwell based chip same as 900 series cards - Titan XP - Pascal based chip same as 10 series cards -AMD (Team Red) Underdog does the same thing but slighly worse and cheaper. (except video rendering) - Gaming - RX 400 series - Cheap - Hot - RX 500 series - Cheap - Ok at VR and deacent gaming frame rates. - Not bad but not particularly great either. - Video Rendering - Fire Pro series - Gaming and Rendering - Vega series -Good luck finding one to buy lmao Case (Fancy clothing for your parts!) - Similar to human clothing you want it to do a few main things really well with compromises for each extreme. - Durability - Steel - Incredibly durable - Creates Farady cage for components - Heavy af - Magnets, just magnets.... - Rust over time - Aluminium - Light - East to bend for modding or "physical maintenance" - Less likely to rust - Huzzah for Farady cages! - Plastic - Just dont - no electrical Ground - no faraday cage - Light AF! - Breath (Airflow) - positive internal airflow! - larger fans push the same amount of air with less speed/noise - Looks - Window? - RGB - Cool Paint? - Fit all your parts - graphics card length/ clearacne - support for liquid cooling raiators? - How many spots for HDD/SSDs - Motherboard format - Cable management! Power Supply (FIGHT MILK) - Rule of thumb: BUy Powersupply that outputs 1.5 times the wattage that you need. - You can walk further than you can you can run. - The PSU can casually output 50-75% power for much longer than at 90-100% (without failure) - If you never demand enough wattage for it to get hot the fan doesnt have to turn on therefore making it quieter. - Modular means you can remove/replace the cables from the PSU. Reputible Brands: Corsair, EVGA Optical Drive (motorized cup holder) - You can download most things today so I'd suggest against it unless you really NEED to watch/write DVD's/CD's Operating System (software that makes everything work) Windows (Always Updates) - Compatible with just about everything - Easy to learn to code on! - POS inital browser - Likely to get virus's Linux (Penguins are cute) - Unique - takes less resources to run - Barebones - Incredibly personalizable! - Compatibility issues with just about everything MacOS (Linux but more annoying) - It is legal! - Great for art and your grandma that doenst know how to use computers! - User friendly - Compatibility issues with various hardware - Confusing/Limiting coding structure Peripherials (cables everywhere!) - Keyboard (higer Polling rate is better) - Mechanical (key is pressed at an exact stroke length every time - Mouse (Higher Polling rate is better) - more buttons = better? - DPI (Dots Per Inch) - In theory, if a mouse has 1600 DPI, then, if you move your mouse one inch (2.54 cm), the mouse cursor will move 1600 pixels - Higher DPI the faster your cursor is able to be moved. - Monitor - In theory the human eye cant see faster than 60 frames per second. - Keep in mind Pixel ratio! - 4k screen that is 22inches will have more pixels in a square inch than a 4k screen that is 28 inches. - Interface? - DVI (Analog) - thumbscrews..... - can do two monitors with one port! - support for 4k - VGA (Analog) - thumbscrews... - max resolution is 1440p - Display Port (digital) - nice button clip - supports 4k - HDMI (Digital) - 1.2 or higer supports 4k - DAC/Speakers/Headphones - Dont even get me started - Microphone - Dont get me started PT.2 Other (other) - UPS (uninterruptible power supply) Just a battery that allows your computer to have some time if the power ever goes out so that you have time to save your work. - Cable Organization materials! - Zipties - velcro - LED LIGHTING! - Manditory - Extra/Better fans - More pressure, less woosh - IFIXIT Pro Tech Toolkit - becasue who buys just one torx wrench. - Cute kitten mousepad - Yes, it has to be a cat. Dont argue 
This is a very general entry into building computers and what you should buy/look for. If you have any questions/comments send me an e-mail!
-Zac Holley-
submitted by Zac_Attack13 to pcmasterrace [link] [comments]

Console gaming is hardly different from PC gaming, and much of what people say about PC gaming to put it above console gaming is often wrong.

I’m not sure about you, but for the past few years, I’ve been hearing people go on and on about PCs "superiority" to the console market. People cite various reasons why they believe gaming on a PC is “objectively” better than console gaming, often for reasons related to power, costs, ease-of-use, and freedom.
…Only problem: much of what they say is wrong.
There are many misconceptions being thrown about PC gaming vs Console gaming, that I believe need to be addressed. This isn’t about “PC gamers being wrong,” or “consoles being the best,” absolutely not. I just want to cut through some of the stuff people use to put down console gaming, and show that console gaming is incredibly similar to PC gaming. I mean, yes, this is someone who mainly games on console, but I also am getting a new PC that I will game on as well, not to mention the 30 PC games I already own and play. I’m not particularly partial to one over the other.
Now I will mainly be focusing on the PlayStation side of the consoles, because I know it best, but much of what I say will apply to Xbox as well. Just because I don’t point out many specific Xbox examples, doesn’t mean that they aren’t out there.

“PCs can use TVs and monitors.”

This one isn’t so much of a misconception as it is the implication of one, and overall just… confusing. This is in some articles and the pcmasterrace “why choose a PC” section, where they’re practically implying that consoles can’t do this. I mean, yes, as long as the ports of your PC match up with your screen(s) inputs, you could plug a PC into either… but you could do the same with a console, again, as long as the ports match up.
I’m guessing the idea here is that gaming monitors often use Displayport, as do most dedicated GPUs, and consoles are generally restricted to HDMI… But even so, monitors often have HDMI ports. In fact, PC Magazine has just released their list of the best gaming monitors of 2017, and every single one of them has an HDMI port. A PS4 can be plugged into these just as easily as a GTX 1080.
I mean, even if the monitoTV doesn’t have HDMI or AV to connect with your console, just use an adaptor. If you have a PC with ports that doesn’t match your monitoTV… use an adapter. I don’t know what the point of this argument is, but it’s made a worrying amount of times.

“On PC, you have a wide range of controller options, but on console you’re stuck with the standard controller."

Are you on PlayStation and wish you could use a specific type of controller that suits your favorite kind of gameplay? Despite what some may believe, you have just as many options as PC.
Want to play fighting games with a classic arcade-style board, featuring the buttons and joystick? Here you go!
Want to get serious about racing and get something more accurate and immersive than a controller? Got you covered.
Absolutely crazy about flying games and, like the racers, want something better than a controller? Enjoy!
Want Wii-style motion controls? Been around since the PS3. If you prefer the form factor of the Xbox One controller but you own a PS4, Hori’s got you covered. And of course, if keyboard and mouse it what keeps you on PC, there’s a PlayStation compatible solution for that. Want to use the keyboard and mouse that you already own? Where there’s a will, there’s a way.
Of course, these aren’t isolated examples, there are plenty of options for each of these kind of controllers. You don’t have to be on PC to enjoy alternate controllers.

“On PC you could use Steam Link to play anywhere in your house and share games with others.”

PS4 Remote play app on PC/Mac, PSTV, and PS Vita.
PS Family Sharing.
Using the same PSN account on multiple PS4s/Xbox Ones and PS3s/360s, or using multiple accounts on the same console.
In fact, if multiple users are on the same PS4, only one has to buy the game for both users to play it on that one PS4. On top of that, only one of them has to have PS Plus for both to play online (if the one with PS Plus registers the PS4 as their main system).
PS4 Share Play; if two people on separate PS4s want to play a game together that only one of them owns, they can join a Party and the owner of the game can have their friend play with them in the game.
Need I say more?

“Gaming is more expensive on console.”

Part one, the Software
This is one that I find… genuinely surprising. There’s been a few times I’ve mentioned that part of the reason I chose a PS4 is for budget gaming, only to told that “games are cheaper on Steam.” To be fair, there are a few games on PSN/XBL that are more expensive than they are on Steam, so I can see how someone could believe this… but apparently they forgot about disks.
Dirt Rally, a hardcore racing sim game that’s… still $60 on all 3 platforms digitally… even though its successor is out.
So does this mean you have to pay full retail for this racing experience? Nope, because disk prices.
Just Cause 3, an insane open-world experience that could essentially be summed up as “break stuff, screw physics.” And it’s a good example of where the Steam price is lower than PSN and XBL:
Not by much, but still cheaper on Steam, so cheaper on PC… Until you look at the disk prices.
See my point? Often times the game is cheaper on console because of the disk alternative that’s available for practically every console-available game. Even when the game is brand new.
Dirt 4 - Remember that Dirt Rally successor I mentioned?
Yes, you could either buy this relatively new game digitally for $60, or just pick up the disk for a discounted price. And again, this is for a game that came out 2 months ago, and even it’s predecessor’s digital cost is locked at $60. Of course, I’m not going to ignore the fact that Dirt 4 is currently (as of writing this) discounted on Steam, but on PSN it also happens to be discounted for about the same amount.
Part 2: the Subscription
Now… let’s not ignore the elephant in the room: PS Plus and Xbox Gold. Now these would be ignorable, if they weren’t required for online play (on the PlayStation side, it’s only required for PS4, but still). So yes, it’s still something that will be included in the cost of your PS4 or Xbox One/360, assuming you play online. Bummer, right?
Here’s the thing, although that’s the case, although you have to factor in this $60 cost with your console, you can make it balance out, at worst, and make it work out for you as a budget gamer, at best. As nice as it would be to not have to deal with the price if you don’t want to, it’s not like it’s a problem if you use it correctly.
Imagine going to a new restaurant. This restaurant has some meals that you can’t get anywhere else, and fair prices compared to competitors. Only problem: you have to pay a membership fee to have the sides. Now you can have the main course, sit down and enjoy your steak or pasta, but if you want to have a side to have a full meal, you have to pay an annual fee.
Sounds shitty, right? But here’s the thing: not only does this membership allow you to have sides with your meal, but it also allows you to eat two meals for free every month, and also gives you exclusive discounts for other meals, drinks, and desserts.
Let’s look at PS Plus for a minute: for $60 per year, you get:
  • 2 free PS4 games, every month
  • 2 free PS3 games, every month
  • 1 PS4/PS3 and Vita compatible game, and 1 Vita-only game, every month
  • Exclusive/Extended discounts, especially during the weekly/seasonal sales (though you don’t need PS Plus to get sales, PS Plus members get to enjoy the best sales)
  • access to online multiplayer
So yes, you’re paying extra because of that membership, but what you get with that deal pays for it and then some. In fact, let’s ignore the discounts for a minute: you get 24 free PS4 games, 24 free PS3 games, and 12 Vita only + 12 Vita compatible games, up to 72 free games every year. Even if you only one of these consoles, that’s still 24 free games a year. Sure, maybe you get games for the month that you don’t like, then just wait until next month.
In fact, let’s look at Just Cause 3 again. It was free for PS Plus members in August, which is a pretty big deal. Why is this significant? Because it’s, again, a $60 digital game. That means with this one download, you’ve balanced out your $60 annual fee. Meaning? Every free game after that is money saved, every discount after that is money saved. And this is a trend: every year, PS Plus will release a game that balances out the entire service cost, then another 23 more that will only add icing to that budget cake. Though, you could just count games as paying off PS Plus until you hit $60 in savings, but still.
All in all, PS Plus, and Xbox Gold which offers similar options, saves you money. On top of that, again, you don't need to have these to get discounts, but with these memberships, you get more discounts.
Now, I’ve seen a few Steam games go up for free for a week, but what about being free for an entire month? Not to mention that; even if you want to talk about Steam Summer Sales, what about the PSN summer sale, or again, disc sale discounts? Now a lot of research and math would be needed to see if every console gamer would save money compared to every Steam gamer for the same games, but at the very least? The costs will balance out, at worst.
Part 3, the Systems
  • Xbox and PS2: $299
  • Xbox 360 and PS3: $299 and $499, respectively
  • Xbox One and PS4: $499 and $399, respectively.
Rounded up a few dollars, that’s $1,000 - $1,300 in day-one consoles, just to keep up with the games! Crazy right? So called budget systems, such a rip-off.
Well, keep in mind that the generations here aren’t short.
The 6th generation, from the launch of the PS2 to the launch of the next generation consoles, lasted 5 years, 6 years based on the launch of the PS3 (though you could say it was 9 or 14, since the Xbox wasn’t discontinued until 2009, and the PS2 was supported all the way to 2014, a year after the PS4 was released). The 7th gen lasted 7 - 8 years, again depending on whether you count the launch of the Xbox 360 to PS3. The 8th gen so far has lasted 4 years. That’s 17 years that the console money is spread over. If you had a Netflix subscription for it’s original $8 monthly plan for that amount of time, that would be over $1,600 total.
And let’s be fair here, just like you could upgrade your PC hardware whenever you wanted, you didn’t have to get a console from launch. Let’s look at PlayStation again for example: In 2002, only two years after its release, the PS2 retail price was cut from $300 to $200. The PS3 Slim, released 3 years after the original, was $300, $100-$200 lower than the retail cost. The PS4? You could’ve either gotten the Uncharted bundle for $350, or one of the PS4 Slim bundles for $250. This all brings it down to $750 - $850, which again, is spread over a decade and a half. This isn’t even counting used consoles, sales, or the further price cuts that I didn’t mention.
Even if that still sounds like a lot of money to you, even if you’re laughing at the thought of buying new systems every several years, because your PC “is never obsolete,” tell me: how many parts have you changed out in your PC over the years? How many GPUs have you been through? CPUs? Motherboards? RAM sticks, monitors, keyboards, mice, CPU coolers, hard drives— that adds up. You don’t need to replace your entire system to spend a lot of money on hardware.
Even if you weren’t upgrading for the sake of upgrading, I’d be amazed if the hardware you’ve been pushing by gaming would last for about 1/3 of that 17 year period. Computer parts aren’t designed to last forever, and really won’t when you’re pushing them with intensive gaming for hours upon hours. Generally speaking, your components might last you 6-8 years, if you’ve got the high-end stuff. But let’s assume you bought a system 17 years ago that was a beast for it’s time, something so powerful, that even if it’s parts have degraded over time, it’s still going strong. Problem is: you will have to upgrade something eventually.
Even if you’ve managed to get this far into the gaming realm with the same 17 year old hardware, I’m betting you didn’t do it with a 17 year Operating System. How much did Windows 7 cost you? Or 8.1? Or 10? Oh, and don’t think you can skirt the cost by getting a pre-built system, the cost of Windows is embedded into the cost of the machine (why else would Microsoft allow their OS to go on so many machines).
Sure, Windows 10 was a free upgrade for a year, but that’s only half of it’s lifetime— You can’t get it for free now, and not for the past year. On top of that, the free period was an upgrade; you had to pay for 7 or 8 first anyway.
Point is, as much as one would like to say that they didn’t need to buy a new system every so often for the sake of gaming, that doesn’t mean they haven’t been paying for hardware, and even if they’ve only been PC gaming recently, you’ll be spending money on hardware soon enough.

“PC is leading the VR—“

Let me stop you right there.
If you add together the total number of Oculus Rifts and HTC Vives sold to this day, and threw in another 100,000 just for the sake of it, that number would still be under the number of PSVR headsets sold.
Why could this possibly be? Well, for a simple reason: affordability. The systems needed to run the PC headsets costs $800+, and the headsets are $500 - $600, when discounted. PSVR on the other hand costs $450 for the full bundle (headset, camera, and move controllers, with a demo disc thrown in), and can be played on either a $250 - $300 console, or a $400 console, the latter recommended. Even if you want to say that the Vive and Rift are more refined, a full PSVR set, system and all, could cost just over $100 more than a Vive headset alone.
If anything, PC isn’t leading the VR gaming market, the PS4 is. It’s the system bringing VR to the most consumers, showing them what the future of gaming could look like. Not to mention that as the PlayStation line grows more powerful (4.2 TFLOP PS4 Pro, 10 TFLOP “PS5…”), it won’t be long until the PlayStation line can use the same VR games as PC.
Either way, this shows that there is a console equivalent to the PC VR options. Sure, there are some games you'd only be able to play on PC, but there are also some games you'd only be able to play on PSVR.
…Though to be fair, if we’re talking about VR in general, these headsets don’t even hold a candle to, surprisingly, Gear VR.

“If it wasn’t for consoles holding devs back, then they would be able to make higher quality games.”

This one is based on the idea that because of how “low spec” consoles are, that when a developer has to take them in mind, then they can’t design the game to be nearly as good as it would be otherwise. I mean, have you ever seen the minimum specs for games on Steam?
GTA V
  • CPU: Intel Core 2 Quad CPU Q6600 @ 2.40GHz (4 CPUs) / AMD Phenom 9850 Quad-Core Processor (4 CPUs) @ 2.5GHz
  • Memory: 4 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA 9800 GT 1GB / AMD HD 4870 1GB (DX 10, 10.1, 11)
Just Cause 3
  • CPU: Intel Core i5-2500k, 3.3GHz / AMD Phenom II X6 1075T 3GHz
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 670 (2GB) / AMD Radeon HD 7870 (2GB)
Fallout 4
  • CPU: Intel Core i5-2300 2.8 GHz/AMD Phenom II X4 945 3.0 GHz or equivalent
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA GTX 550 Ti 2GB/AMD Radeon HD 7870 2GB or equivalent
Overwatch
  • CPU: Intel Core i3 or AMD Phenom™ X3 8650
  • Memory: 4 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA® GeForce® GTX 460, ATI Radeon™ HD 4850, or Intel® HD Graphics 4400
Witcher 3
  • Processor: Intel CPU Core i5-2500K 3.3GHz / AMD CPU Phenom II X4 940
  • Memory: 6 GB RAM
  • Graphics: Nvidia GPU GeForce GTX 660 / AMD GPU Radeon HD 7870
Actually, bump up all the memory requirements to 8 GBs, and those are some decent specs, relatively speaking. And keep in mind these are the minimum specs to even open the games. It’s almost as if the devs didn’t worry about console specs when making a PC version of the game, because this version of the game isn’t on console. Or maybe even that the consoles aren’t holding the games back that much because they’re not that weak. Just a hypothesis.
But I mean, the devs are still ooobviously having to take weak consoles into mind right? They could make their games sooo much more powerful if they were PC only, right? Right?
No. Not even close.
iRacing
  • CPU: Intel Core i3, i5, i7 or better or AMD Bulldozer or better
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVidia GeForce 2xx series or better, 1GB+ dedicated video memory / AMD 5xxx series or better, 1GB+ dedicated video memory
Playerunknown’s Battlegrounds
  • CPU: Intel Core i3-4340 / AMD FX-6300
  • Memory: 6 GB RAM
  • GPU: nVidia GeForce GTX 660 2GB / AMD Radeon HD 7850 2GB
These are PC only games. That’s right, no consoles to hold them back, they don’t have to worry about whether an Xbox One could handle it. Yet, they don’t require anything more than the Multiplatform games.
Subnautica
  • CPU: Intel Haswell 2 cores / 4 threads @ 2.5Ghz or equivalent
  • Memory: 4GB
  • GPU: Intel HD 4600 or equivalent - This includes most GPUs scoring greater than 950pts in the 3DMark Fire Strike benchmark
Rust
  • CPU: 2 ghz
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • DirectX: Version 11 (they don’t even list a GPU)
So what’s the deal? Theoretically, if developers don’t have to worry about console specs, then why aren’t they going all-out and making games that no console could even dream of supporting?
Low-end PCs.
What, did you think people only game on Steam if they spent at least $500 on gaming hardware? Not all PC gamers have gaming-PC specs, and if devs close their games out to players who don’t have the strongest of PCs, then they’d be losing out on a pretty sizable chunk of their potential buyers.
Saying “devs having to deal with consoles is holding gaming back” is like saying “racing teams having to deal with Ford is holding GT racing back.” A: racing teams don’t have to deal with Ford if they don’t want to, which is probably why many of them don’t, and B: even though Ford doesn’t make the fastest cars overall, they still manage to make cars that are awesome on their own, they don’t even need to be compared to anything else to know that they make good cars.
I want to go back to that previous point though, developers having to deal with low-end PCs, because it’s integral to the next point:

“PCs are more powerful, gaming on PC provides a better experience.”

This one isn’t so much of a misconception as it is… misleading.
Did you know that according to the Steam Hardware & Software Survey (July 2017) , the percentage of Steam gamers who use a GPU that's less powerful than that of a PS4 Slim’s GPU is well over 50%? Things get dismal when compared to the PS4 Pro (Or Xbox One X). On top of that, the percentage of PC gamers who own a Nvidia 10 series card is about 20% (about 15% for the 1060, 1080 and 1070 owners).
Now to be fair, the large majority of gamers have CPUs with considerably high clock speeds, which is the main factor in CPU gaming performance. But, the number of Steam gamers with as much RAM or more than a PS4 or Xbox One is less than 50%, which can really bottleneck what those CPUs can handle.
These numbers are hardly better than they were in 2013, all things considered. Sure, a PS3/360 weeps in the face of even a $400 PC, but in this day in age, consoles have definitely caught up.
Sure, we could mention the fact that even 1% of Steam accounts represents over 1 million accounts, but that doesn’t really matter compared to the 10s of millions of 8th gen consoles sold; looking at it that way, sure the number of Nvidia 10 series owners is over 20 million, but that ignores the fact that there are over 5 times more 8th gen consoles sold than that.
Basically, even though PCs run on a spectrum, saying they're more powerful “on average” is actually wrong. Sure, they have the potential for being more powerful, but most of the time, people aren’t willing to pay the premium to reach those extra bits of performance.
Now why is this important? What matters are the people who spent the premium cost for premium parts, right? Because of the previous point: PCs don’t have some ubiquitous quality over the consoles, developers will always have to keep low-end PCs in mind, because not even half of all PC players can afford the good stuff, and you have to look at the top quarter of Steam players before you get to PS4-Pro-level specs. If every Steam player were to get a PS4 Pro, it would be an upgrade for over 60% of them, and 70% of them would be getting an upgrade with the Xbox One X.
Sure, you could still make the argument that when you pay more for PC parts, you get a better experience than you could with a console. We can argue all day about budget PCs, but a console can’t match up to a $1,000 PC build. It’s the same as paying more for car parts, in the end you get a better car. However, there is a certain problem with that…

“You pay a little more for a PC, you get much more quality.”

The idea here is that the more you pay for PC parts, the performance increases at a faster rate than the price does. Problem: that’s not how technology works. Paying twice as much doesn’t get you twice the quality the majority of the time.
For example, let’s look at graphics cards, specifically the GeForce 10 series cards, starting with the GTX 1050.
  • 1.8 TFLOP
  • 1.35 GHz base clock
  • 2 GB VRAM
  • $110
This is our reference, our basis of comparison. Any percentages will be based on the 1050’s specs.
Now let’s look at the GTX 1050 Ti, the 1050’s older brother.
  • 2.1 TFLOP
  • 1.29 GHz base clock
  • 4 GB VRAM
  • $140 retail
This is pretty good. You only increase the price by about 27%, and you get an 11% increase in floating point speed and a 100% increase (double) in VRAM. Sure you get a slightly lower base clock, but the rest definitely makes up for it. In fact, according to GPU boss, the Ti managed 66 fps, or a 22% increase in frame rate for Battlefield 4, and a 54% increase in mHash/second in bitcoin mining. The cost increase is worth it, for the most part.
But let’s get to the real meat of it; what happens when we double our budget? Surely we should see a massive increase performance, I bet some of you are willing to bet that twice the cost means more than twice the performance.
The closest price comparison for double the cost is the GTX 1060 (3 GB), so let’s get a look at that.
  • 3.0 TFLOP
  • 1.5 GHz base clock
  • 3 GB VRAM
  • $200 retail
Well… not substantial, I’d say. About a 50% increase in floating point speed, an 11% increase in base clock speed, and a 1GB decrease in VRAM. For [almost] doubling the price, you don’t get much.
Well surely raw specs don’t tell the full story, right? Well, let’s look at some real wold comparisons. Once again, according to GPU Boss, there’s a 138% increase in hashes/second for bitcoin mining, and at 99 fps, an 83% frame rate increase in Battlefield 4. Well, then, raw specs does not tell the whole story!
Here’s another one, the 1060’s big brother… or, well, slightly-more-developed twin.
  • 3.9 TFLOP
  • 1.5 GHz base clock
  • 6 GB VRAM
  • $250 retail
Seems reasonable, another $50 for a decent jump in power and double the memory! But, as we’ve learned, we shouldn’t look at the specs for the full story.
I did do a GPU Boss comparison, but for the BF4 frame rate, I had to look at Tom’s Hardware (sorry miners, GPU boss didn’t cover the mHash/sec spec either). What’s the verdict? Well, pretty good, I’d say. With 97 FPS, a 79% increase over the 1050— wait. 97? That seems too low… I mean, the 3GB version got 99.
Well, let’s see what Tech Power Up has to say...
94.3 fps. 74% increase. Huh.
Alright alright, maybe that was just a dud. We can gloss over that I guess. Ok, one more, but let’s go for the big fish: the GTX 1080.
  • 9.0 TFLOP
  • 1.6 GHz base clock
  • 8 GB VRAM
  • $500 retail
That jump in floating point speed definitely has to be something, and 4 times the VRAM? Sure it’s 5 times the price, but as we saw, raw power doesn’t always tell the full story. GPU Boss returns to give us the run down, how do these cards compare in the real world?
Well… a 222% (over three-fold) increase in mHash speed, and a 218% increase in FPS for Battlefield 4. That’s right, for 5 times the cost, you get 3 times the performance. Truly, the raw specs don’t tell the full story.
You increase the cost by 27%, you increase frame rate in our example game by 22%. You increase the cost by 83%, you increase the frame rate by 83%. Sounds good, but if you increase the cost by 129%, and you get a 79% (-50% cost/power increase) increase in frame rate. You increase it by 358%, and you increase the frame rate by 218% (-140% cost/power increase). That’s not paying “more for much more power,” that’s a steep drop-off after the third cheapest option.
In fact, did you know that you have to get to the 1060 (6GB) before you could compare the GTX line to a PS4 Pro? Not to mention that at $250, the price of a 1060 (6GB) you could get an entire PS4 Slim bundle, or that you have to get to the 1070 before you beat the Xbox One X.
On another note, let’s look at a PS4 Slim…
  • 1.84 TFLOP
  • 800 MHz base clock
  • 8 GB VRAM
  • $300 retail
…Versus a PS4 Pro.
  • 4.2 TFLOP
  • 911 MHz base clock
  • 8 GB VRAM
  • $400 retail
128% increase in floating point speed, 13% increase in clock speed, for a 25% difference in cost. Unfortunately there is no Battlefield 4 comparison to make, but in BF1, the frame rate is doubled (30 fps to 60) and the textures are taken to 11. For what that looks like, I’ll leave it up to this bloke. Not to even mention that you can even get the texture buffs in 4K. Just like how you get a decent increase in performance based on price for the lower-cost GPUs, the same applies here.
It’s even worse when you look at the CPU for a gaming PC. The more money you spend, again, the less of a benefit you get per dollar. Hardware Unboxed covers this in a video comparing different levels of Intel CPUs. One thing to note is that the highest i7 option (6700K) in this video was almost always within 10 FPS (though for a few games, 15 FPS) of a certain CPU in that list for just about all of the games.
…That CPU was the lowest i3 (6100) option. The lowest i3 was $117 and the highest i7 was $339, a 189% price difference for what was, on average, a 30% or less difference in frame rate. Even the lowest Pentium option (G4400, $63) was often able to keep up with the i7.
The CPU and GPU are usually the most expensive and power-consuming parts of a build, which is why I focused on them (other than the fact that they’re the two most important parts of a gaming PC, outside of RAM). With both, this “pay more to get much more performance” idea is pretty much the inverse of the truth.

“The console giants are bad for game developers, Steam doesn't treat developers as bad as Microsoft or especially Sony.”

Now one thing you might’ve heard is that the PS3 was incredibly difficult for developers to make games for, which for some, fueled the idea that console hardware is difficult too develop on compared to PC… but this ignores a very basic idea that we’ve already touched on: if the devs don’t want to make the game compatible with a system, they don’t have to. In fact, this is why Left 4 Dead and other Valve games aren’t on PS3, because they didn’t want to work with it’s hardware, calling it “too complex.” This didn’t stop the game from selling well over 10 million units worldwide. If anything, this was a problem for the PS3, not the dev team.
This also ignores that games like LittleBigPlanet, Grand Theft Auto IV, and Metal Gear Solid 4 all came out in the same year as Left 4 Dead (2008) on PS3. Apparently, plenty of other dev teams didn’t have much of a problem with the PS3’s hardware, or at the very least, they got used to it soon enough.
On top of that, when developing the 8th gen consoles, both Sony and Microsoft sought to use CPUs that were easier for developers, which included making decisions that considered apps for the consoles’ usage for more than gaming. On top of that, using their single-chip proprietary CPUs is cheaper and more energy efficient than buying pre-made CPUs and boards, which is far better of a reason for using them than some conspiracy about Sony and MS trying to make devs' lives harder.
Now, console exclusives are apparently a point of contention: it’s often said that exclusive can cause developers to go bankrupt. However, exclusivity doesn’t have to be a bad thing for the developer. For example, when Media Molecule had to pitch their game to a publisher (Sony, coincidentally), they didn’t end up being tied into something detrimental to them.
Their initial funding lasted for 6 months. From then, Sony offered additional funding, in exchange for Console Exclusivity. This may sound concerning to some, but the game ended up going on to sell almost 6 million units worldwide and launched Media Molecule into the gaming limelight. Sony later bought the development studio, but 1: this was in 2010, two years after LittleBigPlanet’s release, and 2: Media Molecule seem pretty happy about it to this day. If anything, signing up with Sony was one of the best things they could’ve done, in their opinion.
Does this sound like a company that has it out for developers? There are plenty of examples that people will use to put Valve in a good light, but even Sony is comparatively good to developers.

“There are more PC gamers.”

The total number of active PC gamers on Steam has surpassed 120 million, which is impressive, especially considering that this number is double that of 2013’s figure (65 million). But the number of monthly active users on Xbox Live and PSN? About 120 million (1, 2) total. EDIT: You could argue that this isn't an apples-to-apples comparison, sure, so if you want to, say, compare the monthly number of Steam users to console? Steam has about half of what consoles do, at 67 million.
Now, back to the 65 million total user figure for Steam, the best I could find for reference for PlayStation's number was an article giving the number of registered PSN accounts in 2013, 150 million. In a similar 4-year period (2009 - 2013), the number of registered PSN accounts didn’t double, it sextupled, or increased by 6 fold. Considering how the PS4 is already at 2/3 of the number of sales the PS3 had, even though it’s currently 3 years younger than its predecessor, I’m sure this trend is at least generally consistent.
For example, let’s look at DOOM 2016, an awesome faced-paced shooting title with graphics galore… Of course, on a single platform, it sold best on PC/Steam. 2.36 million Steam sales, 2.05 million PS4 sales, 1.01 million Xbox One sales.
But keep in mind… when you add the consoles sales together, you get over 3 million sales on the 8th gen systems. Meaning: this game was best sold on console. In fact, the Steam sales have only recently surpassed the PS4 sales. By the way VG charts only shows sales for physical copies of the games, so the number of PS4 and Xbox sales, when digital sales are included, are even higher than 3 million.
This isn’t uncommon, by the way.
Even with the games were the PC sales are higher than either of the consoles, there generally are more console sales total. But, to be fair, this isn’t anything new. The number of PC gamers hasn’t dominated the market, the percentages have always been about this much. PC can end up being the largest single platform for games, but consoles usually sell more copies total.
EDIT: There were other examples but... Reddit has a 40,000-character limit.

"Modding is only on PC."

Xbox One is already working on it, and Bethesda is helping with that.
PS4 isn't far behind either. You could argue that these are what would be the beta stages of modding, but that just means modding on consoles will only grow.

What’s the Point?

This isn’t to say that there’s anything wrong with PC gaming, and this isn’t to exalt consoles. I’m not here to be the hipster defending the little guy, nor to be the one to try to put down someone/thing out of spite. This is about showing that PCs and consoles are overall pretty similar because there isn’t much dividing them, and that there isn’t anything wrong with being a console gamer. There isn’t some chasm separating consoles and PCs, at the end of the day they’re both computers that are (generally) designed for gaming. This about unity as gamers, to try to show that there shouldn’t be a massive divide just because of the computer system you game on. I want gamers to be in an environment where specs don't separate us; whether you got a $250 PS4 Slim or just built a $2,500 gaming PC, we’re here to game and should be able to have healthy interactions regardless of your platform.
I’m well aware that this isn’t going to fix… much, but this needs to be said: there isn’t a huge divide between the PC and consoles, they’re far more similar than people think. There are upsides and downsides that one has that the other doesn’t on both sides. There’s so much more I could touch on, like how you could use SSDs or 3.5 inch hard drives with both, or that even though PC part prices go down over time, so do consoles, but I just wanted to touch on the main points people try to use to needlessly separate the two kinds of systems (looking at you PCMR) and correct them, to get the point across.
I thank anyone who takes the time to read all of this, and especially anyone who doesn’t take what I say out of context. I also want to note that, again, this isn’tanti-PC gamer.” If it were up to me, everyone would be a hybrid gamer.
Cheers.
submitted by WhyyyCantWeBeFriends to unpopularopinion [link] [comments]

I had like 3 friends ask me how to build a PC in the past week so I made this to help them. Feel free to use or send me an e-mail if you want the txt file

(Reddit Edit: Help my improve the document with productive comments on what I got wrong or messed up! Im only human lol
Also a lot of this is supposed to be kinda humorous. I didn't think I had to say that but, hey, its the internet.
I appreciate the positive and productive comments! )
Beginners basic guide to building your own PC as of early 2018
(EDIT: Sorry for being a MSI/Corsair Fanboy)
Heres a collection of thoughts to consider when building your own personal PC
As always Id personally use PCPartPicker.com to configure your parts and for further thoughts on compatibility.
First off building a computer is 100% based around what you plan to use the computer for.
Here are a few uses and generic ideas of what to go for. Audio Editing: Lots of small tasks that need to be completed quickly without lag. - Fast Processor( >4GHZ) - Fast RAM (MHZ) -At least 16 gigs! - Fast Storage, SSD manditorily - M.2 or PCI for best performance. - Shitty Graphics card, graphics card there only to keep the cpu from doing other tasks when working. - Can be a few generations or years old. - Many screens for lots of plug in windows to be open Video Editing: Lots of large to render and files to read. - Multi core processor the more the merrier - SSD for fast read/write of large video files. - Insane graphics card, AMD graphics cards are debatibly better but the nvidia Quadro series are specific for video rendering. Gaming: No more than 4 cores intense graphics card - 92% of games are not coded for more than 4 cores so why spend the extra money for it. - SSD for quick load screens - Nvidia cards, 10 series, the higher the number the better. Titan cards for MAXIMUM OVERDRIVE! Coding: quick processor for lots of small tasks. Ergonomic peripherials? - Dear god please dont use a mechanical keyboard so that your coworkers dont kill you. Home office: Everything can be a few gens behind so you can get the best power per dollar spent. - Sorry that Gateway doesnt exist anymore. I guess try Dell... 
Parts (Expensive Legos)
CPU (tells things to go places and outputs data) Basically three main routes to go for: Intel, AMD, or ASIC. Intel - Gaming, Data center, Hackintosh Pros: Cooler, Faster speed (GHZ), short small tasks faster Cons: $$$$, less cores AMD - Gaming, Personal Computing, Large task processing Pros: Lots of cores, better price per performance, faster processing of large tasks Cons: Hot chips, large chips?, compatibility issues with MacOS. ASIC - "Application-specific integrated circuit" Pros: Does the task that they are made to do insanely efficently, great for mining. Cons: Literally does nothing else. Holy hell these are expensive, very hot (fans will get loud) CPU Cooler (Im a big fan) Most come with an in box cooler that are ok but please buy aftermarket. In Box - the free shitty cooler that comes with the processor. Pros: Free. Cons: Ugly, makes chip run hot, hard to clean Air cooler - oldest type of cooler but new designs are highly efficent. Pros: Only cooler that has the possibility of being 100% quiet, most likely cheaper Cons: large, if cooler isnt large enough for the chips thermal output the fans will be loud. Liquid - Custom pipes are beautiful, AIO is easy to install and offers similare performance. Pros: Looks cool, great temperatures, "quiet" Cons: Water pump has possibility of being loud, possible spills Phase Change - uses the technology of refridgerators to cool the chip Pros: Can overclock until the chip breaks. (whats colder than cold? ICE COLD!) Cons: Loud (compressor noise), Large pipes, just why.... Motherboard (the convienacnce store of computer parts) Really just about what type of I/O you want. - MAKE SURE FORM FACTOR FITS YOUR CASE! (or vice versa) - Look for PCI lanes for expansion. - How many graphic cards do you have? - PCI based interfaces? - PCI SSD? - PCI DAC? - PCI WIFI? - USbs? Network? Audio? - How many lanes of RAM? - DOES IT FIT YOUR PROCESSOR!?! (really tho) - M.2? - How many sata interaces? Good Brands: MSI, ASUS, Gigabyte Bad Brands: AS(s)Rock, Dell Memory (Dory) - The more the merrier - No less than 8gb for a functional windows machine (16 gb to never have a problem) - Use all the lanes your computer has to offer! the more lanes to access the faster the data can travel! -Imagine drinking a milkshake. If the straw is wider you can drink more of the milkshake than a skinny straw. - Faster MHZ for faster data access but give minimal performance differances - Please get ram with heat spreadders unles youre building a server with high airflow. - Make sure the type (DDR3 or DDR4) of RAM matches what your processomotherboard call for. Good Brands: Corsair, G.Skill, Ballistix Storage (Grandpa that remembers everythign about how things used to be but takes forever to learn a new tasK) Speed or massive storage? slower is cheaper. Golden ratio of speed/storage/price is 250-500 gb SSD and a 1+ tb disk drive. *Max speeds listed are for a single drive not RAID* Hard Disk Drives (HDD) - Cheapest and slowest - read/write speeds of < 0.5gb/s - 7200+ RPM or GTFO - Higher Speed drives can access data faster. - Do not move while powered up. physical parts will break. - Larger Cahche = faster Read/Write Speeds Pros: Cheap, Holds massive amounts of data Cons: Slower than molasses in a frezer Reputible Brands: Seagate, WD Solid State Drives (SSD) - necessity for quick boots and fast load screens (can only be re-written to so many times) - SATA based (2.5 inch)- Read/Write speeds capped @ 6 gb/s Pros: Most economical, form factor fits with old computers, Cons: "Slow" compared to other ssd's (but stil 12 times faster than a HDD) - M.2 based - Read/Write speeds capped @ 10 gb/s Pros: Size of a sick of gum! High End but not too expensive to be out of reach. Cons: Expensive for any size over 500 gb - PCI based - Read/Write speeds capped @ 20 gb/s for PCI3, x4 Pros: HOLY BANDWIDTH BATMAN! Faster than that little creepy ghost thats always in the corner of you eye Cons: You might have to take out a loan to buy one. *takes up a x4 PCI Lane* Reputible Brands: Samsung! Corsair, Plextor, Intel, Kingston, Crucial Video Card (that one kid that has thick glasses and is really good at math) - A regular old PCI card that handles all of the video rendering and output for your computer. - ASIC PCI cards. - The PCBs and chips are patented by two main companies but the differances come from line up and varying manufacturer cooling devices. - The more memory the better -NVIDIA (Team Green) Great for gaming, has specific card series for intensive rendering. Lazy driver updates. - Gaming - 900 series - Cheap - Low performance - Can play any video game made befrore 2010 on max settings - 1000 (ten) series - Expensive (thanks bitcoin miners...) - Great for VR! - Video Rendering -Quadro Series - Gaming and Rendering - Titan X - Maxwell based chip same as 900 series cards - Titan XP - Pascal based chip same as 10 series cards -AMD (Team Red) Underdog does the same thing but slighly worse and cheaper. (except video rendering) - Gaming - RX 400 series - Cheap - Hot - RX 500 series - Cheap - Ok at VR and deacent gaming frame rates. - Not bad but not particularly great either. - Video Rendering - Fire Pro series - Gaming and Rendering - Vega series -Good luck finding one to buy lmao Case (Fancy clothing for your parts!) - Similar to human clothing you want it to do a few main things really well with compromises for each extreme. - Durability - Steel - Incredibly durable - Creates Farady cage for components - Heavy af - Magnets, just magnets.... - Rust over time - Aluminium - Light - East to bend for modding or "physical maintenance" - Less likely to rust - Huzzah for Farady cages! - Plastic - Just dont - no electrical Ground - no faraday cage - Light AF! - Breath (Airflow) - positive internal airflow! - larger fans push the same amount of air with less speed/noise - Looks - Window? - RGB - Cool Paint? - Fit all your parts - graphics card length/ clearacne - support for liquid cooling raiators? - How many spots for HDD/SSDs - Motherboard format - Cable management! Power Supply (FIGHT MILK) - Rule of thumb: BUy Powersupply that outputs 1.5 times the wattage that you need. - You can walk further than you can you can run. - The PSU can casually output 50-75% power for much longer than at 90-100% (without failure) - If you never demand enough wattage for it to get hot the fan doesnt have to turn on therefore making it quieter. - Modular means you can remove/replace the cables from the PSU. Reputible Brands: Corsair, EVGA Optical Drive (motorized cup holder) - You can download most things today so I'd suggest against it unless you really NEED to watch/write DVD's/CD's Operating System (software that makes everything work) Windows (Always Updates) - Compatible with just about everything - Easy to learn to code on! - POS inital browser - Likely to get virus's Linux (Penguins are cute) - Unique - takes less resources to run - Barebones - Incredibly personalizable! - Compatibility issues with just about everything MacOS (Linux but more annoying) - It is legal! - Great for art and your grandma that doenst know how to use computers! - User friendly - Compatibility issues with various hardware - Confusing/Limiting coding structure Peripherials (cables everywhere!) - Keyboard (higer Polling rate is better) - Mechanical (key is pressed at an exact stroke length every time - Mouse (Higher Polling rate is better) - more buttons = better? - DPI (Dots Per Inch) - In theory, if a mouse has 1600 DPI, then, if you move your mouse one inch (2.54 cm), the mouse cursor will move 1600 pixels - Higher DPI the faster your cursor is able to be moved. - Monitor - In theory the human eye cant see faster than 60 frames per second. - Keep in mind Pixel ratio! - 4k screen that is 22inches will have more pixels in a square inch than a 4k screen that is 28 inches. - Interface? - DVI (Analog) - thumbscrews..... - can do two monitors with one port! - support for 4k - VGA (Analog) - thumbscrews... - max resolution is 1440p - Display Port (digital) - nice button clip - supports 4k - HDMI (Digital) - 1.2 or higer supports 4k - DAC/Speakers/Headphones - Dont even get me started - Microphone - Dont get me started PT.2 Other (other) - UPS (uninterruptible power supply) Just a battery that allows your computer to have some time if the power ever goes out so that you have time to save your work. - Cable Organization materials! - Zipties - velcro - LED LIGHTING! - Manditory - Extra/Better fans - More pressure, less woosh - IFIXIT Pro Tech Toolkit - becasue who buys just one torx wrench. - Cute kitten mousepad - Yes, it has to be a cat. Dont argue 
This is a very general entry into building computers and what you should buy/look for. If you have any questions/comments send me an e-mail!
-Zac Holley-
submitted by Zac_Attack13 to buildapc [link] [comments]

Of Wolves and Weasels - Day 148 - DOGE4DOGE - Building a Worldwide Brand

Hey all, GoodShibe here!
With our Bootstrap Service Economy starting to take shape, I think now is an excellent time for us to talk about Marketing and Advertising and how we're actually more than just a coin - why we're building a Worldwide Brand.
And why that's a great thing.
You see, I read a post today from slipstream-
Reading comments on hacker news and found this interesting comment related to dogecoin...
Which got me thinking. See, traditionally, I've never been a 'sales' person or an 'Advertising' person. In fact, I have, especially when I was younger, espoused a very... uh... Bill Hicks-ish (warning: NSFW language) approach to the topic.
So what changed?
Mostly, my perspective.
Marketing and Advertising are tools, no more or less bad than hammers or power saws. Heck, I spent all last weekend Advertising for the Lego Movie without even realizing it. (Seriously, I'm not being paid for this, but check it out, it's awesome).
But we do it all the time.
We want people to know about and appreciate the same things that we do. We tell people where to try good food, where the best grocery deals are, where the cheapest gas is, what Radio stations we like, what TV shows and movies we're watching.
If you've ever used a Foursquare-ish app to announce your location, you're Advertising for someone - doing their work for them. If you've ever raved about how awesome Game of Thrones is... you're Advertising.
Most of us don't realize it, but there's actually quite a difference between Marketing and Advertising. Advertising is only about getting the word out there - it is only a small part of the Marketing process.
But Marketing itself covers quite a large number of other factors:
"Market research, media planning, public relations, product pricing, distribution, customer support, sales strategy, and community involvement." (From above, linked article)
And, whether we realize it or not, we're actively taking part in this process, daily.
Here's a brief set of examples, just off the top of my head:
Market Research - What are the other coins doing? What's Bitcoin/Litecoin/etc doing?
Media Planning - Hey, let's help get the Jamaican Bobsled Team to Sochi.
Public Relations - See our What is Dogecoin Video
Product Pricing - How many threads exist about us watching the price and waxing poetic about where it should and shouldn't be?
Distribution - Tipping
Customer Support - /Dogeducation, for one. HowToDoge.com, DogecoinTutorial.com, all sorts of options there.
Sales Strategy - DOGE4DOGE is all about helping our coin gain acceptance locally and worldwide
Community Involvement - I'm pretty sure this one goes without saying
Where Marketing and Advertising go to the Dark Side is when it becomes about Lies. When you can't actually sell the product on its merits.
The International Brand that we're building with Dogecoin is something that WE'VE had a say in every step of the way. Our symbol, our coin, has come to represent our values of Fun and Kindness, Compassion and Camaraderie - worldwide, no matter what language you speak.
We fight for the the Underdoge - and we believe that the future of money is in showing appreciation for people, instantly, no matter where they are in the world. Financially empowering the people who are working to make their world a more fun, more interesting, better place to live.
No one person did this. You did, all of us did.
Because we wanted it bad enough.
We took a joke and made the world laugh along with us - and there is more joy and laughter and fun and kindness in the world... thanks to you.
Thanks to Dogecoin.
So while some people might scoff and roll their eyes, I feel that we should continue to pick up and use the tools that we've been given.
Because 'Money' is the least revolutionary thing about us.
We're not 'going' to change the world.
We ARE changing the world.
And we're only just getting started.
It's 9:05AM EST and we're at 81.05% of DOGEs found. Our Global Hashrate is holding strong at ~46 Gigahashes per second and our Difficulty is down from ~866 to ~713.
As always, I appreciate your support!
GoodShibe
DOGE4DOGE - Bootstrap Service Economy - Shibes helping Shibes for Dogecoins - Add yourself to this list in the comments!
Huge ups to calyxa for taking the time put this crazy list in order and add categories. Thank you!!
Cryptocurrency-related:
Engineering and Industry:
Game Tutorial - On-line and Board Games:
Graphics, Video and Art - Tutorial and Service:
Hardware Repair - Tutorial and Service:
Health and Agriculture:
Human Languages:
Music:
Programming and Web Development:
School Tutoring
Writing / Editing:
Projects in need of your attention!
submitted by GoodShibe to dogecoin [link] [comments]

[Discussion] My own personal guide to used hardware alternatives.

Hi there. My name is Jeff. I've been building systems for the better part of 15 years and try my best to contribute here actively. After being involved in this little community for a few years now, I'm noticing a serious lack of discussion about buying used components, and I feel like it's time to shed a little light on the subject for those looking to build on a (seriously) tight budget.
As Linus said in his scrapyard wars video, buying new on $300 isn't practical, and if you posed the challenge to him on a random day, buying used is almost certainly the path he'd choose. As someone who's been "scrapyarding" as a hobby for the better part of 10 years, I figured I'd take some time to share some of what I've learned for the modern audience.
Let's begin with a simple rundown of modern "budget" choices, and I'll tell you what I'd do instead.
CPU
The G3258 and Athlon 860k are the sub-$100 CPUs of choice, and both work just fine. I have built with both in the past, and each carries their own set of advantages.
Used Alternatives: You can go in a couple of directions here; if you happen to have an LGA 1366 motherboard lying around, you can get an i7 920 or better for under $50, and they still hold up reasonably well. Being that LGA 1366 boards are not typically cheap when purchased used, my favourite option is the Phenom II x4 Black Edition series, each of which compare favourably to modern budget options, and will even overclock on some incredibly dated, dirt cheap AM2+ boards. In my experience, eBay prices on these get a little too high for my taste, but I've been able to nab several on Kijiji locally in Toronto for under $50 as well.
GPU
The R7 260x and GTX 750 ti are often cited as budget options for most builders, with the latter serving a very specific role in systems where power draw might be a concern. While there exists no option that can complete with the low consumption of the 750 ti (or even the single 6-pin connector goodness of the 260x), its performance can easily be matched (and exceeded) for less money.
Used Alternatives: The bitcoin mining craze from a few years back led to the Radeon 7950 and 7970 being blacklisted on the used market, and I think the fears about burned-out cards are a little overblown. Here in Toronto, you can easily grab a 7950 for the price of a 260x, but I don't pay anywhere near that for my builds. At most, a Windforce will cost me $125, as where I recently picked up some non-boost edition PowerColor versions for a mere $83 each (bought 3 for $250).
EDIT: Forgot to mention something important - avoid the reference 7950 and 7970. They were employed to a far greater degree in mining rigs because of their rear-only exhaust, and if you see a bunch of them from the same seller listed at once, they're likely old mining cards. Only pick them up if they're incredibly cheap.
Want to go even cheaper? The Radeon 6950 (with the shader unlock, preferably) or even the 6970 will rival the performance of the 260x, and shouldn't cost Canadians more than $50-$60. I personally have 2 in my possession right now, and have gone through at least a dozen in the last 6 months.
In general, one should always avoid Nvidia when buying used, because they are far too popular and overvalued for their performance as they age. I still see GTX 660s selling for $150, which is absolutely absurd.
Motherboards
Motherboards on the used market are weird, and this can largely be attributed to the fact that they're hard to transport and don't handle well over time. As such, people don't really sell boards on their own that often, and you'll likely have more luck finding a combo of some kind (or even a ready-to-go tin-can with no graphics card) for less per part than you will finding a given board on its own.
Used Alternatives: The boards I'd recommend depend entirely on the CPU you've chosen. Being that I'm a fan of the Phenom II x4 series, AM2+ boards are going to be dirt cheap, but DDR2 RAM is actually fucking expensive, so you'd likely be better off going with AM3. I've even seen some used AM3+ boards (The 970 ASRock Extreme3, in particular) for as low as $40, so it wouldn't hurt to look.
On the Intel side, you're actually at a significant disadvantage. Much like Nvidia cards, Intel boards (and CPUs) actually retain their value and don't often come cheap. For me, LGA 1156 is the price/performance sweet spot, granted I can find an i7 8XX to go with it. Even still, they're going to run you a fair bit more than an AMD board, and likely aren't worth it by comparison.
RAM
Ram is ram. DDR2 is pricy as fuck due to an obvious market shortage of the stuff, so the AM2+ board option might not be best by comparison. DDR3 ram, however, is ubiquitous, and I always die a little inside when people building on a "budget" choose to buy new at all. If I'm being honest, I can get DDR3 ram from e-waste recycling companies for as low as $10 per 4GB stick, at 1333MHz, and not once have I ever had a bad stick of the stuff. Even for people going the route of the G3258 (which only supports 1333MHz), this is the clear winner.
Is value RAM ugly as sin? Sure it is. It is just as good as that fancy Ripjaws shit you've got in your current build? You betcha.
Storage
Hard Drives are actually a tricky game, as they are the single most volatile component in any budget build, easily succumbing to wear and tear from age and daily use. As such (and some might find this hard to believe) I actively avoid HDDs when building value systems for people and opt for cheap SSDs instead. As always, check the date on a drive if you're really insistent on buying one, and considering how cheap a WD blue is new, don't pull the trigger on one unless it's for less than $30/TB.
SSDs are obviously (akin to RAM) highly resilient and are nearly guaranteed to work when purchased used. The average SSD pulled from an old laptop or an office off-lease desktop, will have no more than 100GB of writes on it, which leaves 99% of its life for you to exploit. While there exists no specific recommendation for which brand to buy, just be sure you're getting a relatively good drive with SATA III capability. 120/128GB variants of these sorts should cost you no more than $50 in my native Canada, and I've even gotten lucky on some larger sizes too. Recently I picked up 4 256GB Samsung 840 Pros for $75 each (I came), just days after I bought a Crucial MX100 of the same size for $85.
Monitors
Monitors are fun to buy, because the recent shifts in display technology have rendered a lot of recent-but-obsolete models nearly valueless. For example, remember when 16:10 was a thing? I actually still like 1680x1050 monitors, but the rest of the world seems to disagree, so I've been able to pick up 23" variants for as little as $40. Being that the slightly lower resolution actually eases the strain on your VRAM a bit, it's a nice fit for a lot of budget cards that might not have a full 2GB available, like some variants of the 6950. 1600x900 monitors are often just as cheap and come with the same inherent benefit of being obsolete despite being almost as good as its bigger 1080p cousin.
Keyboards and Mice
If you're on a budget, we can't even have this discussion. As much as I like mechanical keyboards and high-precision gaming mice, people building used $300 systems aren't going to allot any of their budget buying them. That said, wired USB keyboards and mice are virtually free (search your local goodwill or value village for some), and if you have to pay money, buy a wireless combo for $20 new from some little shit store in a suburb somewhere.
Cases
Cases on their own sell for about half of their original retail price, give or take based on the condition. I normally just get them as a part of a tin-can bundle and make use of them if they aren't too dirty, but when building for someone else, I'd often just prefer to buy a new budget case in the $40 range.
PSUs
I saved this topic for last, because it's by far the most difficult category to master. First off, you really need to do your research and understand how PSUs work before delving into these guys, as the cost associated is almost entirely dependent on how resilient the underlying platform has been proven to be. Generally speaking, reading reviews on JonnyGuru and HardOCP is a great start, but none of them account for units that are several years old.
As a general rule of thumb, I use the EVGA 500W W1 as a reference point, and build my value tree around that. In other words, if a new EVGA 500W (a passable, proven budget unit) is cheaper than a used 500W variant of a better brand, why would I bother buying used? Sure, that 520W Seasonic S12II puts the EVGA to shame in terms of voltage regulation and ripple suppression, but can I really make the same claims of a unit that's 5 years into its life? Wouldn't I just be safer buying new? These are all factors you have to consider.
For me, the threshold lies around 50% in terms of cost savings vs. risk. In other words, if you can find a used quality unit for less than half the price of the cheapest quality unit available at a given time, buy it.
Anyhow I think that covers everything. And as a closing note, remember to be safe. Meet potential sellers (and buyers) in public, well-lit places, and try your best to avoid entering someone's home without some protections in place. Also, the more info you get about the person (address, phone number, etc) the less likely it is that a person will be trying to scam you. People who purposely conceal their identity do so for a reason.
Also, feel free to ask me anything about my own experiences buying and selling used. I've been doing it as a hobby for a long, long time and have sold many value builds to people who can't otherwise afford PCs. I'm happy to impart any wisdom I might've gained over the years.
Edit: CPU Coolers! Forgot those. Air coolers are a safe bet. They're slabs of copper and aluminum with fans strapped to them. Buy with confidence, and seek one out for $10-$15 if you plan to overclock. AIO water cooling is not so safe. Those things are typically only good for 2-3 years, and you have no idea how much longer a pump has before it gives. Budget builders likely aren't water-cooling anyhow, right?
Edit 2: Just to be clear, when I said I'd been doing this for a long time, I should clarify that a) I once owned a game store and sold systems out of there and b) I currently resell systems out of my house to raise money for charity builds. I really don't want people to get the impression I'm trying to sell anything.
submitted by Oafah to buildapc [link] [comments]

2019 should be the year that you start your food business... Here's how (Mini-AMA all weekend)

So you love to eat. No kidding! You need to eat to live. So does everyone else. Starting a food business is fun, stressful, and it's a blast when someone you have no clue who they are likes what you made.
You have a burning desire to start a hot sauce / juice / beverage / cookie / baked goods / bitcoin gummy bear company. Basically if someone wants to put it in their mouth, you have an idea for it. So let's get to it. Break it down, from start to finish (lol, it's never done).
WARNING: This may seem as some what self-promoting, but the only thing I will say now is that I started a 3PL shipping company specifically for food items. No links to it, but you can check my post history, but I'll save you the time. I used to be a web / app developer, got tired of the grind with trying to get clients to pay, got tired, bought a food truck with ZERO experience (seriously, my first event I bought 300 loaves of bread. Used 4.5. It was pretty comical and family / friends ate sourdough for WEEKS). I brought the food truck up, had the truck, a pop-up restaurant on Las Vegas Blvd., got an offer to sell the physical truck and book of business, took it, and kept the name rights. Now I'm using my skills both in tech and food to streamline and help foodpreneurs. Take this with whatever grain of salt you want.
Also, to state real quick, DO NOT PM ME QUESTIONS... I am here to open things up so everyone can learn, so the next person looking how to start up a hot sauce company gets relevant information and not "Sent you a PM." I'm gonna be around all weekend, and want to help everyone. I'll try and make responses as detailed / personalized as I can. The more info you post, the more I can help.
Part 1: You have an idea - Great - Treat it like a start-up, because it is
Food can be unsexy. Kitchens are hot, you burn yourself, you get covered in grease, you slip on stainless steel floors (true), and every once in a while theres some knife cuts. BUT, when you know that you just bought a $20 case of potatoes (50 lb) and are selling french fries for $6 for like 3oz of potatoes, your fave words become "Would you like fries with that?"
Key 1 - Know your numbers. Go shopping. You already have your idea, so go shopping. Make a test recipe at home, solely for the purpose of cost analysis. Jump on google sheets, and list EVERY ingredient on your list, and then look at other things, which I call hidden costs.
Visible Costs - Recipe ingredients, packaging, labeling Hidden Costs - How long does it take you to cook / bake / make (labor time), how long do you need to cook it (oven wear and tear, gas, electric for mixer, etc)
You can have a ton of hidden costs beyond just the actual ingredients, and these often get overlooked. If you plan on growing the business, get a friend and your phone and take pictures of HOW YOU WANT IT DONE along each step. Create the "brand" manual for your food / baked good / sauce, etc. Is the hot sauce supposed to be chunky? Is it supposed to be smooth? Are the cookies supposed to be a 30% shade of brown for crispness, and how long did you leave it in the oven for? Those should ALL be documented. You have the time now, and you should be doing it.
Key 2 - Find your suppliers, and find about discounts
You know what you need, and retail might not be the cheapest, or it could be. Play the sales. If you are making a cookie that uses bananas, can you take advantage of price matching at Walmart vs a restaurant supply store to get a better deal and cheaper ingredients? As a smaller company / maker, this should be a good idea, as it will help you create your MVP much cheaper.
Part 2: For the love of everything holy use google to find about your licensing requirements. (I won't do this for you as part of the AMA, just an FYI).
Everyone seems to get tied up with "Can I make this soup / cookie / hot sauce." The short answer is yes, you can, and you can test it legally. It'll take a few dollars, but it's worth it because of the access you can get.
  • Start with your local city or county health department. As you can see from my name, I'm in Vegas. Southern Nevada Health District manages all of the food. They will handle the licensing for food establishments and producers. If you need some Google help, search "[my city] health department]" "[my county] health department]" and if that search returns unfruitful, then search for "[my city] cottage food laws" "cottage food laws [my city / my county]" because small producers will 90% of the time be allowed to create small batches of what are considered "non-hazardous foods" in a home kitchen with little to no oversight. WHAT THIS MEANS: You will most likely be able to bake cookies, cupcakes, make a hot sauce, MAYBE a soup, basically anything that is heated / cooked and can be left out and still be fine. There is almost zero chance your sushi delivery service will be allowed. Fun fact, you cannot serve raw bacon, but under some cottage food laws, cooked bacon is fine because it is turned into a "jerky" classification. So you need to read. I'm not a lawyer, I just like paperwork. Don't be an idiot.
  • Licensing of some sort will be a key part of you starting to get out there. Theres a semi-good chance you can sell on FB, to friends family, at a school bake sale, or even through Etsy / your own online shop without getting any kind of official letter or licensing requirements. SWAT isn't coming because you're selling grandmas cookies on Etsy, so breathe and relax. If you go to a craft show, farmers market, etc, that is when the licensing comes into play, but putting that time and effort / money into it will put you lightyears ahead of everyone else doing it out of their house. Also, fees tend to be pretty low, so you can test your idea from SOMEONE WHO IS EXCHANGING MONEY FOR YOUR GOODS AND DOES NOT CARE ABOUT YOUR FEELINGS. Everyones family / spouse / friends won't really be too keen to tell you "Yo dawg, this is garbage sauce / cupcake / icing / soup" so gathering feedback on what works cheaply before you use student loans on your hot sauce idea is a good thing. Few dollars up front to keep you from doing something dumb.
  • If you are going to go through the trouble of going through licensing to go to a farmers market, etc., then please, child, have a seat and start collecting feedback. Make your product better. It's not hard. "Hey, free half cookie for an email for a survey, and when we launch, we will email you a 30% off coupon." It's not hard, survey money and google forms are free. Mailchimp is free for small accounts. Do the work, otherwise throw your money away at a strip club.
Part 3: Liability and the business
You've now established that grandma wasn't lying to you, and your bacon jerky business is viable, and you're starting to see an increase in orders. Here's what to do next, now that you've "proven the concept" beyond people who will lie to you.
  • Get an LLC / Corp. Use something like Gust Launch, Clerky, or Stripe Atlas. <--- Use google. No links. Time to use your big boy pants. Open a new tab. An LLC / Corp will allow you to set up a business bank account, so when something goes wrong (it will), you can separate your personal life from the business. It's less than $1,000, and worth every penny.
  • Get a business bank account. Credit unions are dope, but big banks work too. Also, cash is fine, but the more credit cards you process, the better. Different schools of thought on this, I just like not having to deal with cash. Some banks charge you a cash handling fee over a certain cash deposit limit (true story). I found a trick to get around this. Go to a check cashing / payday loan place, buy a money order (free usually), then deposit the money order. It's not cash. Just my $.02.
  • BUY BUSINESS INSURANCE.... It's cheap. We paid like $100 a month for $500k in coverage if memory serves me right, and scaled up based on what the client needed through umbrella policies. Our truck insurance for business was like $300 a month on the commercial vehicle. You're dealing with food, and people can get sick. Just do it. When it saves your ass down the road, message me and you can buy me a 2 for $3 Rockstar from 7-11 as a thank you.
  • WTF are you actually selling is a big thing, and regulations will play a pretty big part of this, because it may fall under some OTHER, LARGER authority. There was a post recently for someone who wanted to repackage cheese as part of a cheese of the month box. Bro, FDA and USDA are all over that. There are several agencies I would never want to run afoul of, FBI, IRS, SEC, and FDA. Seriously, you'll get smacked harder than a toddler falling out of a shopping cart if you anger any of those agencies. Use Google. Heres an example. Friend of mine wanted to start a meal prep company, and wanted to do fresh juices. Seems simple because fresh juice places are everywhere right? Not. According to FDA regulations, even for small producers, any part of a "fresh juice" derived from "any part of the fresh vegetable / fruit" was supposed to be handled and cared for according to HCAAP and be pasteurized. Now, fun fact.... Making fresh juice "to order" does not fall under these categories because it would be intended for "immediate consumption." So as long as the meal prep guys made food ahead of time, but only made the juice and bottled it same day, it would fall under these guidelines, and wouldn't be tied to a whole host of regulations and expense. Leave it overnight? Nahh, can't do it. Same day? Totally fine. LEARN TO READ, BECAUSE A SMALL CHANGE COULD SAVE YOU. I've already decided I wouldn't do good in prison, so I don't want to go to jail.
  • You'll need a corporate structure and an EIN most likely for official licenses and for tax reporting. If you're selling online, something like TaxJar is a godsend. You'll need this also if you connect to your POS system to get paid and make that monnnaaayyyyyyy....
  • Something that I've seen brought up here countless times is "well I'm getting busy but my mom / wife / grandma needs to cook in the kitchen," or the good problem to have, "I'm busy with orders because the local news station picked it up and I can't make it fast enough." You're going to want to start investigating what are called "commissary kitchens" or "rentable commercial kitchens" and again, use the googles. [my city / county] commissary kitchens. There are a ton in almost every major city (except Vegas, dunno why). Or search for "kitchens for rent by the hour." You'll get access to larger / better equipment, usually rentable all-in by the hour, so it'll help you plan and budget, because earlier you did all the recipe and timing cards so you know how long it will take (see, I'm not a complete idiot).
Part 4: Launching
HOOOLLLLYYYYYYYYY SHHHHHIIIIIITTTTTTTTTTT..... You're ready to go big time, and are listening to "All I do is win" on repeat on your speakers and standing in your front yard shooting your not-a-flamethrower in the sky. Some things you should start to think about:
  • Branding is big. Have you secured the .com? You need to. There are different schools of thought on if different TLD's are okay. I say no, personally, and I won't pick a name if the .com isn't available. Work on a decent label or branding sticker. Packaging is key as well. For bottles, check out SKS Bottle. For boxes check out U-Line. You might be able to find someone cheaper locally, because shipping is a huge expense of heavy boxes / packaging (supplier to you). Check out StickerMule, Lightning Labels, or google "label suppliers." If you want the non-shiny labels, look for "matte" labels.
  • Social will be major. Not only for being able to launch your own brand, but if you ever decide to go into retail, or distribute. It's common sense in this day and age. I will tell you, that if you have a product that is consumer based, show them how to use it. Hot sauce? Start making recipes and posting them with your hot sauce. Cookies? Show different ways cookies can be given as gifts. Interact with people celebrating things. Pay attention to holidays. Bacon jerky? Go to a NASCAR event, biker rally, take pics, and interact. Give samples away. Go where your target market is.
  • Distribution. Take a listen to "Major Distribution" by 50 Cent. Great hype song. Or Go Getter by Young Jeezy. You're now the Columbians trying to get your hot sauce crack into as many hands as you can. You're selling online, spending hours packaging each bottle with care, printing labels, while you child is crying and your wife is burning rice for the 6th night in a row. Your hands smell like Kraft packaging. Bubble wrap is your defacto blanket....
STOP READING HERE BECAUSE THIS IS SEMI-SELF PROMOTIONAL BECAUSE I AM GIVING TIPS RELATED TO WHAT I DO. LOOK FOR THE NEXT SET OF ALL CAPS TO SKIP THIS ENTIRELY.
A regular distributor will take your product, buy it, and resell it. They may add it to their product catalog, maybe a "hey, Massive Diablo Hot Sauce is a new sauce we are carrying, want to try it?" "Nahhhhh..." "Okay, normal hot sauce it is then." You are the owner of your hot sauce. You're the owner of your packaged cookies. You're the owner of your gluten free, purple yam potato chip. You care the most. You can go the traditional distribution route, and it can happen, but for someone to want to pick you up, you need traction. That's where a food 3PL comes into play (which is a grossly underserved market imho). You pay to rent space in a warehouse, usually by the pallet or half pallet size, pay monthly, and then you pay each order sent out. You need to make sure the numbers work for this.
You're now shipping orders more efficiently, and most likely taking advantage of their shipping discounts because of volume. Straight forward, we plug our own account details into ShipStation for FedEx and get even better rates because of the volume we do. The more you ship, if you have a loading dock, etc. all play into your rates.
Now, you've offloaded the task of shipping to someone else, and are free to focus on sales, growing the business. If you move to a co-packer (more below), your co-packer is sending your stuff to us in bulk, and we are shipping, basically moving you out of the equation almost entirely. You'll need someone who tracks lot numbers, shipment dates, and more in case of a recall, and who got what in an inventory management system (we do, hence the tech background). Temp, shelf life, FIFO, expiration dates, and breakage all are things you need to consider when working with someone.
OKAY YOU CAN KEEP READING NOW THAT YOU'VE SKIPPED THE SELF PROMOTION (KIND OF) PART
  • Co-packers will save your sanity, your relationships, and keep you from smelling like chocolate chips or ghost peppers on date night. Because you've done your starards manual, and updated it based on tweaks, you can start searching for a co-packer. Google the meaning. It's not hard. Don't ask me what a co-packer is. Youre going to want to look at things like capacity, non-disclosure agreements, secrecy, length in business, and packaging capabilities. I know of one place here in Vegas that will do cookies, in different sizes, and will package several different ways. Not everyone will. Look for things like turn around time, lead time, graphics capabilities, and more. I'm sure I'm forgetting something, but if I think of it, see the comments.
Congrats!!!!!!! You've now made the next Tabasco, Auntie Ann's Pretzels, Chips Ahoy, Sriracha, Fresh Squeezed Juice conglomerate. I expect to see all of you on store shelves, and if this helped, send me some food. I'll eat it, or my girlfriend will.
Quesadillas are sandwiches. Fight me. See you in the comments.
submitted by Brianvegas to Entrepreneur [link] [comments]

Questions post! (Newbie miner) Also potential build included at bottom.

Important note: I have tried searching for most of these questions, and as for earnings, the only things I can find are people from 2014-2015 saying that GPU mining is dead, and on the other topics, it's all very vague or overly complex answers which my brain can't wrap itself around.
So hopefully this post won't be totally trampled, as I will probably ask some really stupid question. Bear in mind, I recently discovered bitcoin mining about 10 days ago. Since then I've had some good replies from a miner on another subreddit, and he assures me that GPU mining is now back in action. This is ofcourse dependent on power prices, but with my 0.04$ kW/h, I was all good.
At first I didn't wanna go all-in with this, but seeing Bitcoin rise in prices, and being personally very sure that it'll keep rising, I'm more intrigued to up the ante.
I'll also try and update this post as it goes along with "yes/no" answers, as/if they get answered.
So, here we go!
First off, I wanted to ask questions in regards to Bitcoin mining and GPU mining. Personal opinions are of course welcome.
  1. Is GPU mining still viable? I've already been told by one person that it is, but would like to hear other people's opinion.
  2. Will Bitcoin mining become harder and less profitable in the near (2-3 years) future? The reason I ask this, is because I've read that only the chinese with the best ASIC's can keep earning money today, and for them, it also becomes harder every day, and they earn less and less. Hopefully this isn't true.
  3. As the price of Bitcoin goes up (if it does), will NiceHash mining become more and more profitable?
In this next section, I wanna dive a bit more into NiceHash, and what it is exactly.
From what I've read, it basically rents out your hashing power, so you're not really mining, despite the program being called "miner".
  1. Is there something I missed there, or is that correct? Are you just renting out your hashing power?
  2. If the above is right, does NiceHash always rent out your hashing power to whatever is most profitable?
  3. What exactly is Lbry, Lyra2REv2, Pascal, Equihash etc.? Are they pools? Algorithms?
  4. Say I go to the profibility calculator, and I see that Lyra2REv2 is the most profitable for my GPU, at 39.5%. Does this then mean that I should pick only that in my NiceHash algorithm settings? Or should I pick the ones who are at 29.8% (Lbry) and 23.8% (Equihash) aswell? Does that increase my gains?
  5. If the last one above was correct, would it then be best to check the calculator daily, and only select the algorithm that earns the most based on %?
  6. Is the NiceHash profitability calculator correct, or is it just very rough estimates? Can I really earn 1220$ worth in Bitcoin over 1 year on my GTX 1080ti? (disregarding Bitcoin price changes ofcourse)
Now I'd like to delve more into my own calculations, what I have per today, and what I would like to try out. I'm very glad if you could point out some huge flaws in my plan, and crush my dreams. I would appreciate that a lot more than just letting me try it and loosing tons of capital. Obviously, if there's a question of just risking it, I'll take this decision myself. But helpful input is always welcome!
My GPU, daily profit, power cost etc.
  • GTX 1080ti FE
  • Daily profit: 5-8$
  • Power cost: 0.04$ (I live in Norway)
  • Environment: Humid, cold, lot of wind
  • Living area: Above ground "basement"
So I don't know if all of the above matters, but that's at least something to go by. From what I can understand, these are good conditions. Correct me if I'm wrong.
I was curious as to what I could earn if I built a proper dedicated rig for pure GPU mining. So I went to a popular website we use called Komplett.no and checked out some prices. Here's what I got. Bear in mind that these are all new parts with at least 2 year warranty and 5 year customer warranty.
  • Mobo: ASUS Prime Z270-P, Socket-1151 (146$)
Picked this MOBO as you could have up to 8 (?) GPU's connected to it with some nifty connectors.
  • CPU: Intel Celeron G3930 Kaby Lake (60$)
Just found whatever CPU that was cheapest.
  • RAM: Crucial DDR4 2133MHz 4GB x2 = 8gb (85$)
Cheapest I could find for the MOBO.
  • SSD: Kingston A400 120GB 2.5" SSD (70$)
Also the cheapest. Could probably find something even cheaper on our "craigslist" but I guess it's best to have a new warranty.
  • PSU: Corsair AX1200, 1200W PSU (403$)
From what I understand, AX is platinum rated, and I assume this would be best if I'm going to maybe implement more than 2 graphics cards in the future? Or would it be best to buy 2 cheaper gold ones and connect them together? And do you get significant profit increases if you go up in rating? Or is too small to even bother?
  • GPU: 980GTX x2 on our "craigslists" (475$ for both)
This is probably where I'll have the hardest time deciding. I could go for 1080's, pay more, and earn more. If this was the case, I would also be able to buy them new with a warranty on them. The decrease in value would also not be as big as with 980's. But is it worth it? I can get 1080's used for around 595$, and probably around 540$ if I haggle a little bit.
Total: 1239$ for the 980 SLI build. According to the profitability calculator, this will earn me 2440$ per year before taxes, electricity bills etc. Biggest question is then: Is this total bogus, or is it roughly correct if Bitcoin stays at the price it is today/rises?
So that's all I have up until now! I haven't seen any post this long on this subreddit yet, so if this is considered "spam" or "2much" please feel free to delete it and toss me a warning. I'm just very excited about GPU mining, and instead of posting questions every day and so forth, I'd rather just ask everything in one post :)
Thanks for reading, and have a nice day!
submitted by Tex-- to NiceHash [link] [comments]

ECOCRYPTO

ECOCRYPTO
ECOCRYPTO
FOR GREEN CRYPTOCURRENCY MINING
FUTURE OF CRYPTOCURRENCY
DEPENDS ON ECOLOGICAL MINING
"CRYPTOCURRENCY DEPENDS ON ECOLOGICAL MINING"
Donate BTC to support awareness enquiry:
1EaSG3WmY5fRXedhy9tbbJK3tGftKp4sAZ
Sourcece: https://cryptobriefing.com/green-crypto-mining-38bn-future/
· Home
· Analysis
· Green Crypto Mining Will Define The Industry’s $38bn Future
Chones / Shutterstock & CB
ANALYSIS

Green Crypto Mining Will Define The Industry’s $38bn Future

Energy usage will drop by design thanks to these critical industry developments.

📷By Nick Hall On Aug 10, 2018
1,779
1
In March this year, the sky officially fell in for Bitcoin miners. With the slump in prices and the extraordinary energy consumption it takes to mine the coins, Fortune revealed that mining a Bitcoin cost as much as buying one. Green crypto mining wasn’t even on the radar for most people until earlier this year.
That was back in March and they were the good times. Morgan Stanley revealed in April that Bitcoin miners would lose money if Bitcoin slipped below $8,600, even with low electricity figures factored in.
A recent study by Coinshare showed that the numbers attributed to the Bitcoin mining industry have been grossly exaggerated and the energy consumption is approximately 50% of the claimed 70TWh. But the numbers are still too high in terms of the financial outlay and the environmental impact of mining cryptocurrency.
Mining doesn’t begin and end with Bitcoin – and although the consensus is (mostly) set in stone, the way we create the energy needed to extract the next part of the puzzle isn’t. Which is why green crypto mining is the ONLY solution to the diminishing returns issue: more cost, for less reward, will eventually lead to an abandonment of the mine, just as it did for gold miners in California in 1848-49.
We’re not looking for one single solution either. We need four separate ones:
  1. A lighter consensus algorithm
  2. Cloud-based cryptocurrency mining.
  3. Renewable, cheaper energy sources to support physical ‘mines’.
  4. Brutal consolidation in the mining industry.

What is cryptocurrency mining?

The Proof-of-Work (PoW) protocol was popularized by shadowy Bitcoin founder Satoshi Nakamoto, building on earlier work by a variety of computer scientists including Hal Finney, and it’s a two-stage process to validate transactions and keep a flow of Bitcoins entering the market. Blocks of data are parsed off and, with Bitcoin, they contain about 1MB. Each block is then locked and coded.
Miners then compete to solve the puzzle and provide the 64-digit hexadecimal key code that it then has to match with a corresponding ‘nonce’, numbers used only once, to claim the reward for unlocking the block and mine Bitcoins. There’s a small fee for validating the transactions, but the Bitcoin miners are really like the old gold miners and they’re after the big paydays.

Why is Bitcoin mining expensive?

In the old days, Bitcoin mining was easy. Back in 2009, a standard desktop computer could mine up to 200 Bitcoin a day. But speed is everything and Bitcoin mining turned into an arms race as Bitcoin soared and the well-funded miners went to war.
Companies like Bitmain, Bitfury and Vogogo spotted a gap in the market and brought professionalism to the Bitcoin mining industry. The Wild West days fell by the wayside and suddenly a standard computer chip would take 98 years to mine one coin, as the super fast rigs of the new breed simply stomped the casual miner into the dust.
The cryptocurrency mining industry even caused the great computer graphics card drought of 2017-2018 as demand for GPUs literally outstripped supply. Used cards were even selling above sticker price and the shelves in-store were stripped bare, but the big guns were already spending tens of millions of dollars to put these home brew operations out of business.
These aren’t computers anymore, they are mission control centers and the power it takes to keep them running is a serious issue for the company’s bottom line and the environmental lobby.
So the industry is looking for a number of different green crypto mining solutions, that will gel together in some haphazard way to form the future of the cryptocurrency market.
The main obstacles are:

1. A greener algorithm

It may be hard to visualize the blockchain itself, but we don’t need to. Technology almost always gets lighter, smaller and slimmer. The same needs to happen to block production.
Blockchain is middleware and it needs to be slimmed down, without sacrificing security or functionality. That’s an ongoing evolutionary process, as it was with smartphones, and the blockchain we’re using in 20 years will likely have little in common with today’s code.
Proof-of-Stake consensus algorithms have been pitched as one way of reducing crypto’s carbon footprint. Instead of competing for block rewards, producers would take turns, weighted by the size of their stake in the network.
Staking is unlikely to catch on in the Bitcoin community, but it has many supporters with Ethereum as well as other cryptocurrencies.. That would make the whole validation process more efficient and cheap.

2. Cloud-based cryptocurrency mining

There are mining firms that are still investing millions of dollars in physical equipment and taking on all the sunk costs, when the Cloud is simply taking over the world of advanced computing.
Cloud-based cryptocurrency mining companies are already selling packages to the general public and the Cloud offers increased security, speed and essentially a small slice of the world’s computing power, rather than the machines you buy, install and power up. It also potentially offers AI integration that could leave the traditional cryptocurrency miners hopelessly panning for gold in a dead river.
The Cloud has made self-driving cars and robots a reality. It can certainly ramp up the speed of calculations and leave even a multi-million dollar mining rig trailing in its wake.
The switch to Cloud-based mining is good news for the environment, too, as the power demands would move to localities with the cheapest energy. Without these wild spikes in energy consumption and without these concentrated mines, the main complaints about the industry will simply cease to be an issue.

3. Renewable, cheap energy for grand-scale mines

Cloud-based cryptocurrency mining looks like the obvious solution, but it’s the final cost that determines the methodology when it comes to crypto mining and there is more than one way to do this.
Technically, the likes of Elon Musk could turn the arid sub-Saharan scrubland into the biggest and most prosperous cryptocurrency mine in the world with a vast array of solar panels and Tesla PowerPack batteries to keep it running through the night.
Cheap land and free energy means that hardware would be the only major cost to consider in this instance. Alternatively, a State-sponsored mining firm in a smaller nation could easily co-opt hydroelectric or solar providers to work with them to reduce energy costs. Even the ones that use grid power can select the world’s cheapest nations and bulk buy energy in blocks.
Potentially, then, we could still have the grand-scale mines that bring economy of scale and environmentally-friendly energy production to the world of cryptocurrency mining.

4. Brutal consolidation

It does not matter how the industry develops, or if Cloud computing or giant mines are the future, the days of the home cryptocurrency miner are numbered.
Just like the mom and pop mines of the goldrush days gave way to corporate giants with drilling and excavation machinery that made the old pick and shovel look slightly ridiculous, the same will happen in cryptocurrency mining.
Competition will continue to grow, the margins will likely drop even further and the flagrant energy use of today’s cryptocurrency miners simply won’t be an option. Miners that don’t streamline their operations and adopt some form of green crypto mining process will simply run at a loss until they go out of business.
Bil Tai is the Chairman of Hul 8, the North American arm of Bitfury Group and one of the biggest suppliers of cryptocurrency mining equipment of the world. Even he expects just 5-10 giant mining companies to survive the impending cull.
“It’s totally different this year,” he told Bloomberg. “The bitcoin mining industry was this mysterious, dark, cottage industry. It’s about to grow up and scale institutionally.”
There’s a dark side to these tech giants emerging, as they will technically have the power to exert an influence on a coin’s value, not just its creation. That is a problem the industry will have to examine at some point. This simple danger, though, is not enough to turn back the tide of progress.
So, we can expect to see a handful of mining companies dominate the industry as they make the best use of the available technology.

Conclusion: Green Crypto Mining Isn’t An Option: It’s The Only Option

One way or another, the environmental issues that dog the cryptocurrency mining industry are set to disappear.
It will be the free market that drives down that energy usage, rather than regulations and sanctions. The days of the home crypto miner are simply coming to an end, though, as the industry matures and large companies descend and fight for dominance in what could become a $38 billion a year industry by 2025.
That comes with its own set of tradeoffs, especially for philosophical hardliners. Like it or not, a leaner, greener cryptocurrency mining process is just around the corner, and big business is going to create it.
ECOCRYPTO
FOR GREEN CRYPTOCURRENCY MINING
FUTURE OF CRYPTOCURRENCY
DEPENDS ON ECOLOGICAL MINING
"CRYPTOCURRENCY DEPENDS ON ECOLOGICAL MINING"
Donate BTC to support awareness enquiry:
1EaSG3WmY5fRXedhy9tbbJK3tGftKp4sAZ
submitted by yakutami01 to btcgreen [link] [comments]

Does anyone here do bitcoin mining and if so, have you made a profit from it?

I looked into bitcoin mining about 5 years ago and at that time the most common method was to use your home PC to mine with. I recall that it required a very expensive graphics card and you had to have your computer mining 24/7 to have any hope of making money from it. It seems no one does that now and instead people use "ASICs" to mine with which cost around £500 for the cheapest models. Would buying one to mine bitcoins be a viable endeavour, or would I be unlikely to even recoup the initial investment?
submitted by CerberusArcProjector to AskUK [link] [comments]

$750 Quadruple Monitor Linux Rig

I'm using the same formatting here as suggested by the Tek Syndicate forums. Thanks for the help guys, it is much needed!
Intro
I don't know much about building computers, yet, so thanks for reading this. I need a computer that can push four monitors. I use Linux which complicates things. Choosing the graphics card seems to be the hardest part for me. I'd like to get a graphics card that is either supported on Linux by the manufacturer with proprietary drivers or one that is supported with open source drivers. Whichever is fine, I just want it to work. Eyefinity support would be great too, I have 3 1920x1200 monitors in portrait mode so I'd like to run them all as one display when I watch movies (this way I can watch 4K content).
Budget. How much are you willing to spend?
$750. Spending less would be nice. I will spend more than $750 if need be.
Where do you live (what country), and what currency do you use?
United States. I live in a big city so I also have plenty of physical stores near by (microcenter, best buy, etc.)
Is there a retailer you prefer?
Newegg/Amazon (I have free 2 day shipping on those sites). I will buy wherever is the cheapest though.
Do you need or already have peripherals? (this can add to costs)
I already have these items:
What will you be using your future computer for? Gaming? Rendering? Mix of both? Or is this a home media PC?
Web browsing, photoshop, watching video (not editing video), and programming. I don't game so I won't need as powerful of a computer. I really need something that can push all 4 monitors while Web browsing, photoshop, watching video, and programming at the same time.
Do you overclock or want to get into overclocking?
Overclocking isn't a priority for me. If the CPU and graphics cards can be overclocked then I will if cooling isn't a problem.
Do you plan on going for custom watercooling now, or in the future?
No.
OS. Do you need a new one?
No. I use Ubuntu, Debian, and Arch. I will also be installing Windows 7 Home Premium with a license key I have.
Do you plan on mining bitcoin?
Yes! If cooling isn't a problem I certainly will be mining bitcoin or litecoin.
Do you render movies or photshop pictures?
I edit photos with GIMP but I may move to Abode Photoshop. I don't edit much video.
If there are any parts that you must have, and you don't want to be swayed against, such as a particular graphics card cooler, or a certain SSD, case, etc., then please specify that.
I'd like to get a 128gb SSD. I don't need any additonal storage.
I'd like to get 8gb of FAST ddr3 ram.
3 of my monitors have displayport which helps for picking a graphics card!
I want the motherboard to have USB 3.0. Front or back ports is fine with me.
I'd like to get a Fractal Design case. Cheaper black minimal cases work for me as well.
I have these parts from an old desktop I scrapped if they are useful:
submitted by weehooherod to buildapc [link] [comments]

I bought 8 290Xs. What now?

I ponded whether or not to mine bitcoin, then the ASICs were announced. Luckily, I didn't preorder Butterfly Labs, but that whole scenario made me a skeptic. I pondered whether or not to buy a Bitcoin ASIC (the first month the terraminer was on Preorder), and I let that slip by. I pondered whether or not to mine Litecoin, and that slip by. I'm still very skeptical about Litecoin ASIC shipping times so in the meantime, I decided I will buy one when they are available to ship, not for preorder. Till then, I decided to force myself into purchasing high performing cards and mining. I think about things WAY too much and often end up convincing myself not to do them. There's no going back, I'm tired of looking into the water and trying to see if it's warm or not— debating whether I should dip my feet in. I've jumped in 8 graphics cards deep. I've been looking at building guides for months, but after mark-ups and outdated builds, I'm reaching out to see what builds would be good for mining with these 8 cards. Any links or advice would be very much appreciated.
SIDE NOTE: I have two GTX 690s I purchased for my incredibly powerful, yet amazingly irritating hackintosh, which I am now incredible frustrated and eventually will be turning in for a Mac Pro. I've been getting about 1150 KH/s with the two cards running CudaMiner on OS X or 530~560KHs Vert— Do you think it's worth it to keep the cards in my new build? Or sell them on eBay?
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=291126412466
TL;DR
part 1: Bought 2 XFX/6 Sapphire 290Xs for $2400, $300 each, and I would like to know what is the most efficient, cheapest mining rig to build around it. I have looked at many guides (not the software quite yet), I am open to using Linux as I hear that is the best and would preferably like to be able to control the units remotely.
part 2: I also have access to two GTX 690s hashing at 1150kh/s scrypt, 530~560KHs scrypt-N— is it worth running these if I have access to free electricity? Or should I sell them on ebay?
submitted by litereddit to litecoinmining [link] [comments]

What's the best low-cost mining ASIC?

I've been mining for a long time with really cheap hardware, and my baseline graphics card (NVidia no less) no longer makes the break, even for Scrypt-based altcoins. Because of that, I'm considering to do something more serious and start mining Bitcoins with an ASIC, to keep my wallet more or less full. I don't expect to earn much out of it (and I haven't earned that much anyway), with about 0.1 BTC per month after electricity bills I can settle. What is the cheapest decent miner you can recommend me?
submitted by csolisr to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

How to buy basic electronics, phone plans, computers, etc. Partial finance thread.

So, you're out from under your parent's nose and you need your own stuff to cut contact or just become independent. You're reading this, so I will assume that you A. Have at least one method of connecting, whether it be a smartphone, laptop, tablet, etc. And B. You have the skills to operate everything but just don't know what's good and what could get you in trouble. I'm also going to assume that your budget is LOW if you're just starting out.
Computers
Where to buy: * Stores like Best Buy, walmart, target (Expensive, new things only) * "Mom and pop" computer stores (Cheaper, used/refurbished) * Craigslist/Ebay (Cheapest most times, used, just old models, refurbished)
What to look for:
Think about what you need it for. College? Internet only? Work computer with Microsoft Office installed? Or are you needing a gaming computer or something for mining bitcoin or something super speed? If you're needing a computer more for college or work or basic internet, you'll be okay with getting an older system or used system. If you are needing a gaming rig, it will be costlier. Below are some specifications you may need for either type.
Work/College - Anything single core or dual core processor, 2GB (Gigs) RAM, and 250GB hard drive or better (Higher of everything is better). Either Windows 7 or 8 is fine. Make sure Microsoft Office is installed, although if you find a good deal that doesn't have it, you can download OpenOffice as a free program alternative. Be aware, it may not be the best depending on your work or school needs.
Gaming - Gaming specs change rapidly based on the games you prefer playing. If you're into the old-school games, you'll want at least a dual-core processor, 4GB ram, and 500GB hard drive along with a NON-integrated graphics card with at least 250MB RAM onboard. If you like the new stuff and want to play the latest games as of 2014, you're going to need something with a quad core processor, GTX/HD/GT video card with 1GB or more onboard RAM. Also, 4-8GB computer RAM and 1TB hard drive.
Laptops- You can decrease those numbers given a little bit if you're looking for a laptop.
*Tablets- *If you're going to buy a tablet, make sure you get the things you need on it and be aware, exactly, of what you need. Do you need a USB port? Extra keyboard because you intend to use it as a laptop? Then you might wanna go more the Microsoft Surface route. If not, and you like apps and such, go more the Android route.
Phone- Your choices are Iphone, Android, and Windows Phone, and older non-smart phones. The cost is anywhere from $30-120 a month. Buy at any phone shop, Verizon, US Cellular, Virgin Mobile, or other, it depends on your area. Sadly, these are generally your only choices as buying phones off craigslist does NOT generally come with a phone plan/phone number. You must enter a contract generally. (There are some non-contract options out there. I know nothing about them except I do know they are pre-paid only.) Phone contracts- Be very, very, very careful when it comes to signing up for a phone contract. There are few choices nowadays and all of them have nice fine print that could mean you paying hundreds of dollars extra for this or that service, or problem. Phone contracts have a MINIMUM length. By signing up for one, you're saying you will pay whatever you owe, for the whole year (or two). Ask questions. If you have to cancel before the contract is up - what fees are there? What fees are there for this or that service? What happens when you need an upgrade, do you have to sign another contract? Is there a minimum time before you can upgrade? What's the internet data limit? Etc. Phone itself - Make sure you 1. Get all your needs. Bigger screen, smaller keyboard, memory card, EXTRA CHARGER (I can't say that enough. Specially with Apple products.) Extra battery also. Get as much as you can free with your contract/purchase.
TV Do not go overboard. Like with computers, make a list of the things you'd like your TV to be able to do. Internet capable? Certain screen size or quality output? (32" vs 40") (1080p vs 720p, 3d mode). Certain options (Firewire port? USB ports? Surround sound ports?) Don't get above what you need, regardless of how cool it is. Measure your space before buying. Determine how it will stand, or how it will connect to the wall if you're wall mounting it. Let the pros wall mount it if you've never done it before - TVs are heavy!
warranty purchase (FOR ALL ELECTRONICS!) - Some people say the warranty isn't worth it. I personally disagree. Get at least a 1 year Warranty. If you can't afford it, you can't afford the item. My story: I bought a DVD player once, and got a 1 year warranty. 11 months later, it suddenly died while playing my favorite movie. I took it in, said there's a disc stuck and I'd like to repair it, and two weeks later I was given the disc and a new DVD player because mine couldn't be repaired, no fuss. Bought another warranty for the new one, and I still have the thing to this day. Buy the blasted warranty. Keep the paperwork of the warranty and the electronic papers/cds/cables/etc in the safest possible spot you can put it in.
*Financing a purchase: * 1. Don't unless it is absolutely positively necessary for your job/college. Gaming is not a requirement to make you money (Unless you're a youtube star or something.) 2. If you have to, get a credit card SEPARATELY from the credit cards available at shops like Best Buy. Those things will rip you off with high interest. Search for a credit card with 0% interest for 6-12 months. Pay with your purchase with that and commit to paying it off within that 6-12 months time frame. 3. If you can't pay it off in 6-12 months, don't buy the item. You can't afford it. Save your money up or buy a less-expensive item. You can ALWAYS buy a new thing that fits your needs better once you have the money for it.
Feel free to ask questions. Or correct me.
edit: Formatting and spelling.
submitted by cacille to RBNLifeSkills [link] [comments]

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Does 2 Years of Mining Ruin A Graphics Card? - YouTube

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